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Wisconsin's 9th congressional district: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wisconsin's 9th congressional district is a former congressional district of the United States House of Representatives in Wisconsin. It was created following the 1870 Census along with the 8th district, and was disbanded after the 2000 Census. The district included most of the western and north-western suburbs of Milwaukee. It contained all of Washington and Ozaukee counties, most of Dodge and Jefferson counties, the northern and western halves of Waukesha county and the eastern parts of Sheboygan county, including the town itself.[1] It was usually the most Republican district in the state, voting 63% to 34% for George Bush over Al Gore at the 2000 election.[2]

Electoral history

Wisconsin's 9th congressional district: Results 1992–2000[3]
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
1992 Ingrid K. Buxton 77,362 28% F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. 192,898 70% David E. Marlow Independent 4,619 2% Jeffrey Holt Millikin Libertarian 1,881 1% *
1994 (no candidate) F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. 141,617 100% *
1996 Floyd Brenholt 67,740 25% F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. 197,910 74% *
1998 (no candidate) F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. 175,533 91% Jeffrey M. Gonyo Independent 16,419 9% *
2000 Mike Clawson 83,720 26% F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr. 239,498 74% *
*Write-in and minor candidate notes: In 1992, write-ins received 27 votes. In 1994, write-ins received 336 votes. In 1996, write-ins received 225 votes. In 1998, write-ins received 368 votes. In 2000, write-ins received 237 votes.

References

  1. ^ Alamanac of American politics 2002 edition, Michael Barone, pages 1646,1676-8
  2. ^ Barone
  3. ^ "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/index.html. Retrieved 2007-08-08.  
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