The Full Wiki

Wolfgang Paul: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Paul
Born August 10, 1913(1913-08-10)
Lorenzkirch, Saxony, Germany
Died December 7, 1993 (aged 80)
Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Nationality Germany
Fields Physics
Institutions University of Bonn
Alma mater Technical University of Munich
Technical University of Berlin
University of Göttingen
Doctoral advisor Hans Kopfermann
Known for Ion traps
Notable awards Nobel Prize in physics (1989)
Notes
Wolfgang Pauli humorously referred to him as his 'real part.'

Wolfgang Paul (August 10, 1913 – December 7, 1993) was a German physicist, who co-developed the ion trap. He received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989 for this work.

Wolfgang Paul was born on 10 August 1913 in Lorenzkirch, Germany. He grew up in Munich where his father was professor for pharmaceutic chemistry. After the first few years at the Technical University of Munich he changed to the Technical University of Berlin in 1934 where he finished his Diplom in 1937 at the group of Hans Geiger. He followed his doctorate advisor Hans Kopfermann to the University of Kiel and after being drafted to the airforce he finished his PhD in 1940 at the Technical University of Berlin. For several years he was private lecturer at the University of Göttingen with Hans Kopfermann. He became professor for Experimental Physics at the University of Bonn and stayed there from 1952 till 1993. For two years from 1965 until 1967 he was director of the Division of Nuclear Physics at CERN.

In 1957, Paul was a signatory of the Göttingen Manifesto, a declaration of 18 leading nuclear scientists of West Germany against arming the West German army with tactical nuclear weapons.

During World War II, he researched isotope separation, which is necessary to produce fissionable material for use in making nuclear weapons. His son Stephan Paul is a professor of experimental physics at the Technical University of Munich. His son Lorenz Paul is a professor of physics at the University of Wuppertal.

External links

References

  • Paul W. (1990). "Electromagnetic Traps for Charged and Neutral Particles". Reviews of Modern Physics 62 (3): 531–540. doi:10.1103/RevModPhys.62.531.  
  • Paul W., Steinwedel H. (1953). "Ein neues Massenspektrometer ohne Magnetfeld". Zeitschrift für Naturforschung A 8 (7): 448–450.  
Advertisements

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Wolfgang Paul (August 10, 1913December 7, 1993) was a German physicist, who co-developed the ion trap. He received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989 for this work.

Sourced

  • There are many examples in physics showing that higher precision revealed new phenomena, inspired new ideas, or confirmed or dethroned well-established theories.
    • in Electromagnetic Traps for Charged and Neutral Particles, Nobel Lecture, December 8, 1989

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English


Wolfgang Paul (born in Lorenzkirch, Germany 1913 - Bonn 1993) was a German professor awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1989.

Biography

Paul was born on August 10 of 1913 in the German city of Lorenzkirch, Saxony. When he was young, his family moved to Munich, where his father taught pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of Munich. In 1932, he began his studies of physics at the Superior School in Munich, and soon moved to the 1934 at the headquarters of Berlin, getting his doctorate in 1939.

In 1944, he began his teaching at the University of Göttingen and 1952 was hired at the University of Bonn as director of its Institute of Experimental Physics, a position he kept until his death.

Wolfgang Paul died December 7 of 1993 at his residence in Bonn.

Scientific research

During WWII he investigated the separation of isotopes, which is necessary to produce material to make nuclear fission for use in nuclear weapons.

He started his research into ions, developing the so-called ion trap.

For this discovery, in 1989 he was awarded half of the Nobel Prize in Physics, shared with Hans G. Dehmelt.

Between 1965 and 1967, he was was appointed Director of the Division of Nuclear Physics at CERN.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message