Woodland: Wikis

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ecologically, a woodland is a low-density forest forming open habitats with plenty of sunlight and limited shade. Woodlands may support an understory of shrubs and herbaceous plants including grasses. Woodland may form a transition to shrubland under drier conditions or during early stages of primary or secondary succession. Higher densities and areas of trees, with largely closed canopy provide extensive and nearly continuous shade are referred to as forest.

Woodland is used in British woodland management to mean any smaller area covered in trees, however dense. (Forest is usually used in the British Isles only for more extensive wooded areas, again however dense – and also including Royal forests, which may not be wooded at all). The term Ancient Woodland is used in British nature conservation to refer to any wooded land that has existed for a very long period (equivalent to the American term old growth forest).

Woodlot is a closely-related American term, which refers to a stand of trees generally used for firewood. While woodlots often technically have closed canopies, they are so small that light penetration from the edge makes them ecologically closer to woodland than forest.

Contents

Woodland ecoregions

Limber Pine woodland in the Toiyabe Range of central Nevada.
A woodland ecosystem at Morton Arboretum in Illinois.
Biomes
Terrestrial biomes
Tundra
Taiga/boreal forests
Montane grasslands and shrublands
Temperate coniferous forests
Tropical and subtropical coniferous forests
Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests
Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub
Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests
Tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests
Temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands
Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands
Deserts and xeric shrublands
Flooded grasslands and savannas
Riparian
Wetland
Aquatic biomes
Pond
Littoral/intertidal zone
Mangrove forests
Kelp forest
Coral reef
Neritic zone
Continental shelf
Pelagic zone
Benthic zone
Hydrothermal vents
Cold seeps
Pack ice
Other biomes
Endolithic zone
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Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and shrublands

Temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands

Montane grasslands and shrublands

Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub

Deserts and xeric shrublands

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

There is more than one place called Woodland:

United States of America

This article is a disambiguation page. If you arrived here by following a link from another page you can help by correcting it, so that it points to the appropriate disambiguated page.

Simple English

Biologically, a woodland is an area with trees that is not a forest. A woodland lets sunlight to penetrate between the trees, so there is little shade. In a forest the branches and leaves of trees are many so that there is always shade.

Woodlands may support an under layer of shrubs, herbs, or grasses.

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