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YUBA Liga
Yugoslavian Basketball League
86 px x 117px
YUBA Liga
Sport Basketball
Founded 1945
Country(ies) Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia
Serbia and Montenegro Serbia and Montenegro
Serbia Serbia
Continent European Union Europe
Official website Official Website

The YUBA Liga, named Atlas Pils YUBA Liga for sponsorship reasons, is the name of the two-tiered, national basketball league in Serbia, comprising the top level Super League and the second level First League, each having their own men's and women's divisions. It was the national basketball league of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia from 1945-1992. After that it was the national basketball league of the former Serbia and Montenegro. It is the forerunner of the international Adriatic League, which is today the closest league in existence to the YUBA Liga during the days of the former Yugoslavian Basketball League.

Contents

History

After the formation of Yugoslavia in 1945, there arose a need for athletic development in the fledgling nation. Post-WW2 Yugoslavia was (with the exception of major cities such as Belgrade, Ljubljana, Zagreb, and Sarajevo) for the most part lacking in competitive opportunities in sports. In response to this, 1945 and 1946 saw an explosion of new clubs and leagues for every sport, the YUBA Liga being part of this phenomenon.

The very first competition under the newly formed YUBA Liga in 1945, drawing parallel to the Yugoslav First League, was more or less a nation wide affirmation of unity. Instead of individual clubs competing in the usual fashion, there were only eight teams. Six representing each state within Yugoslavia, one representing the province of Voivodina, and the last representing the [[[Yugoslav People's Army]].

Only in the 1970s did the basketball culture of Yugoslavia truly come to enjoy recognition as the top nation in basketball. Breaking away from the dominance of the Soviet Union, the YUBA Liga gave rise to stars that would go on to win multiple Basketball World Championships and European Basketball Championships. After a decade of dominance, the 1980s saw a disappointing slump of talent in the Yugoslavian Basketball League.

Once again the world witnessed a sleeping giant come awake in the early 90s as Yugoslavia won two straight European Basketball Championships and a World Basketball Championship. This momentum was swiftly halted by the ethnic strife which broke out in 1991, and divided the nation into five successor republics, each founding their own basketball federations with the exception of Serbia and Montenegro, which retained the name Yugoslavia and the YUBA Liga.

When Serbia and Montenegro peacefully separated in 2006, the YUBA Liga became a Serbia-only organization, with Montenegro forming its own federation:

Although they each have their own leagues, five of the six nations now take part in the Adriatic League, only recently founded in 2001 (Macedonia is not currently represented in that league). The Adriatic League is now the closest league to what the YUBA Liga was in the former Yugoslavia.

Competition Format

Both the Super League and First League partake in double round robin style qualification round, where each team plays every other team both at home and away. Even the quarters, semis, and finals are played at home and away, including a tie-breaker if necessary with the home advantage awarded to the better qualifying team.

The Super League men's contains eight clubs, while women's contains six. Immediately after the qualification round are the semi finals, in which the top four qualifying teams compete in. While the two leagues work exactly the same, the First League however, contains almost twice as many clubs as the Super League, fourteen and twelve for men's and women's respectively and therefore includes quarter finals.

Current Teams

Team City Arena
KK Atlas Belgrade Vizura Hall
OKK Beograd Belgrade Pionir Hall
KK Borac Čačak Borac Hall
KK Budućnost Podgorica Morača Sports Center
KK Crvena zvezda Belgrade Pionir Hall
KK Ergonom Niš Čair Hall
KK FMP Belgrade FMP Hall
KK Hemofarm Vršac Millennium Center
KK Mašinac Kraljevo SPC Ibar
KK Mega Ishrana Belgrade Sport Eko Hall
KK Mornar Bascet Bar OS Jugoslavija
KK Napredak Rubin Kruševac Hall of Sports
KK Partizan Belgrade Pionir Hall
KK Primorka Bar OS Jugoslavija
KK Sloga Societe General Kraljevo SPC Ibar
KK Vojvodina Novi Sad Spens Sports Center
KK Zdravlje Leskovac SRC Dubočica

Past Yugoslav Cup Champions

(As Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)

  • 1945 - Jugoslovenska Armija (later Partizan)
  • 1946 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1947 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1948 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1949 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1950 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1951 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1952 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1953 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1954 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1955 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1956 - Proleter
  • 1957 - Olimpija
  • 1958 - OKK Beograd
  • 1959 - Olimpija
  • 1960 - OKK Beograd
  • 1961 - Olimpija
  • 1962 - Olimpija
  • 1963 - OKK Beograd
  • 1964 - OKK Beograd
  • 1965 - Zadar
  • 1966 - Olimpija
  • 1967 - Zadar

(championship format change)

  • 1967/1968 - Zadar
  • 1968/1969 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1969/1970 - Olimpija
  • 1970/1971 - Jugoplastika
  • 1971/1972 - Crvena Zvezda
  • 1972/1973 - Radnički
  • 1973/1974 - Zadar
  • 1974/1975 - Zadar
  • 1975/1976 - Partizan
  • 1976/1977 - Jugoplastika
  • 1977/1978 - Bosna
  • 1978/1979 - Partizan
  • 1979/1980 - Bosna
  • 1980/1981 - Partizan
  • 1981/1982 - Cibona
  • 1982/1983 - Bosna
  • 1983/1984 - Cibona
  • 1984/1985 - Cibona
  • 1985/1986 - Zadar
  • 1986/1987 - Partizan
  • 1987/1988 - Jugoplastika
  • 1988/1989 - Jugoplastika
  • 1989/1990 - Jugoplastika
  • 1990/1991 - POP 84 (Jugoplastika)
  • 1991/1992 - Partizan

(As Serbia and Montenegro)

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Notable teams

Notable players

See also

External links


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