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Years in film
Filmreel2.jpg
1870s
1880s
1890s
1890 • 1891 • 1892 • 1893 • 1894
1895 • 1896 • 1897 • 1898 • 1899
1900s
1900 • 1901 • 1902 • 1903 • 1904
1905 • 1906 • 1907 • 1908 • 1909
1910s
1910 • 1911 • 1912 • 1913 • 1914
1915 • 1916 • 1917 • 1918 • 1919
1920s
1920 • 1921 • 1922 • 1923 • 1924
1925 • 1926 • 1927 • 1928 • 1929
1930s
1930 • 1931 • 1932 • 1933 • 1934
1935 • 1936 • 1937 • 1938 • 1939
1940s
1940 • 1941 • 1942 • 1943 • 1944
1945 • 1946 • 1947 • 1948 • 1949
1950s
1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954
1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959
1960s
1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964
1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969
1970s
1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974
1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979
1980s
1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984
1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989
1990s
1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994
1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999
2000s
2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004
2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009
2010s
2010 • 2011 and beyond

This list of years in film indexes the individual year in film pages. Each year is annotated with the significant events as a reference point.

19th century in film

See also: 19th century in film

1900s

See also: 1900s in film

  • 1900 - The first French Union Cinematography Chamber is founded by Georges Méliès.
  • 1901 - Edison's Black Maria shuts down.
  • 1902 - A Trip to the Moon by George Méliès is released. Pathé acquires the Lumière brothers patents. The first permanent structure designed for screening of movies in the US is Tally's Electric Theater, in Los Angeles, California.
  • 1903 - The Great Train Robbery by Edwin S. Porter, has a cowboy firing a gun at the camera. The movie is a breakthrough in techniques: cross cutting, double exposure composite editing, camera movement and on location shooting. The three elder Warner Bros. begin in the exhibition business. Gaston Méliès, Georges' brother, opens a branch of Star Film in New York to defend its production's copyrights.
  • 1904 - The Great Train Robbery, a remake by Siegmund Lubin. Loews Theaters is founded by Marcus Loew; it will be the oldest theater chain operating in North America by the time it merges with AMC in 2006. Touring cinema begins in India, as Manek Sethna starts the Touring Cinema Co. in Bombay. All Méliès films begin being made with two negatives, the second of which is sent to New York to serve the American market.
  • 1905 - The first "Nickelodeon" is born when Harry Davis and John P. Harris open their small, storefront theatre under that name on Smithfield Street in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Swamikannu Vincent, a draughtsman for the railways in India, sets up a touring cinema going around small towns and villages in the South of India. Maurice Costello, who will become the first of the matinee idols, stars in his first film, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.
  • 1906 - The world's first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang, released in Australia.
  • 1907 - Ben Hur, directed by Sidney Olcott. Louis B. Mayer opens his first movie theater in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Pathé opens an office in India. Florence Turner, the "Vitagraph Girl", makes her debut in Cast Up by the Sea.
  • 1908 - Thomas Edison forms the Motion Picture Patents Company, also known as the Edison Trust, also known as the First Oligopoly, a trust of all the major film companies (Edison, Biograph, Vitagraph, Essanay, Selig, Lubin, Kalem, American Star -Méliès-, American Pathé), the leading distributor (George Kleine) and the biggest supplier of raw film, Eastman Kodak. Pathé invents the newsreel that was shown in theaters prior to the feature film. New York-based Kalem Studios was the first to open a permanent studio in Jacksonville, Florida. Over the course of the next decade, more than 30 film companies established studios in Jacksonville, including Metro Pictures (later known as MGM), Edison Studios, Majestic Films, King Bee Film Company, Vim Comedy Company, Norman Studios, Gaumont Studios and Lubin Studios. In Paris, Méliès presides over the first International Cinema Congress, attended by all major producers in the world. Jean, the Vitagraph Dog and the first Dog Hero of the silver screen, makes his screen debut with Director / Trainer Laurence Trimble.
  • 1909 - Matsunosuke Onoe, who would become the first superstar of Japanese cinema, appears in his first film, Goban Tadanobu. Carl Laemmle starts the Yankee Film Company with partners Abe and Julius Stern, the seed to what will be Universal Studios. Again in Paris, Méliès presides over the second International Cinema Congress, obtaining the landmark decision of standard perfuration for film, enabling international projection. The first motion picture studio in the Los Angeles area was established by the Selig Polyscope Company in Edendale, with construction beginning in August 1909.

1910s

See also: 1910s in film

1920s

See also: 1920s in film

1930s

See also: 1930s in film

1940s

See also: 1940s in film

1950s

See also: 1950s in film

1960s

See also: 1960s in film

1970s

See also: 1970s in film

1980s

See also: 1980s in film

1990s

See also: 1990s in film

2000s

See also: 2000s in film

2010s

  • 2010 - films scheduled to be released in 2010
  • 2011 - films scheduled to be released in 2011
  • 2012 - films scheduled to be released in 2012
  • 2013 - films scheduled to be released in 2013

References

  • The Silent Cinema Reader edited by Lee Grieveson and Peter Kramer
  • Movies of the 30s, edited by Jürgen Müller, Taschen
  • The Magic of Méliès, documentary by Jacques Mény, special collector's edition DVD, Spain

External links

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