The Full Wiki

Yoni: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Part of a series on
Hinduism

Aum

History · Deities
Denominations
Mythology

Beliefs and practices

Philosophy · Dharma
Artha · Kama · Moksha
Karma · Samsara
Yoga · Bhakti · Maya
Puja · Temple

Vedas · Upanishads
Ramayana · Mahabharata
Bhagavad Gita · Puranas
Dharmaśāstra · others

Related topics

Hinduism by country
Gurus and saints
Reforms · Criticism
Calendar · Hindu law
Ayurveda · Jyotisha
Festivals · Glossary Persecution

Yoni (Sanskrit: योनि yoni) means “source or origin of life”. The ancient Vedas contain the word yoni in various contexts. The meaning of the word expanded, and got a secondary meaning "Divine Passage". A child was considered to be born from a yoni of stars - constellations that prevailed during the child birth. The Aryans had identified some 50,000 astrological yonis that favour a child's birth. The term yoni was also used in agricultural references by the Aryans. A 'fertile yoni' meant a good harvest of crops.


The yoni is also considered to be symbolic of Shakti or Devi in Hindu Tantra.

The worship of the yoni in Shaktism has the fullest elaboration at the Ambuvaci festival in Assam, India, which is held late each June. During Ambuvaci, the Goddess Kamakhya is worshipped in her temple outside of Guwahati, Assam.

A stone yoni found in Cát Tiên sanctuary, Lam Dong, Vietnam.
A stone yoni with carved Nāga in Jawi temple, East Java, Indonesia.

Possible lingam-yonis have been recovered from the archeological sites at Harappa and Mohenjo-daro, part of the Indus Valley Civilization. There is strong evidence to support cultural continuation from the Indus Valley Civilization (Harappan; Indus-Sarasvati) to Vedic and modern Hindu practices. [1]

See also

Notes and References

  1. ^ Lal, B.B. (2002). The Sarasvati Flows On: The Continuity of Indian Culture. Aryan Books International. ISBN 8173052026.  







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message