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Yu-Gi-Oh! World Championship Tournament 2004: Wikis

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Yu-Gi-Oh! World Championship Tournament 2004
Yu-Gi-Oh! World Championship Tournament 2004 Cover.png
Developer(s) Konami
Publisher(s) Konami
Series Yu-Gi-Oh!
Platform(s) Game Boy Advance
Release date(s) JP February 5, 2004
NA February 10, 2004
PAL March 26, 2004
Genre(s) Card Battle
Rating(s) ESRB: Everyone
PEGI: 3+

Yu-Gi-Oh! World Championship Tournament 2004, known in Japan as Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters 9: Expert 3 (遊戯王デュエルモンスターズ エキスパート3), is a video game based on the Yu-Gi-Oh! franchise. This game has been released on the Game Boy Advance system.

Contents

Gameplay

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Changes from Eternal Duelist Soul

This game has many obvious similarities to The Eternal Duelist Soul. The duel system is almost exactly the same, but there are a few differences.

Positive Changes

  • The musical score and sound effects are vastly improved
  • The menus and sub-menus are easier to navigate, and the menu skin is improved
  • You now have the capability to create three separate dueling decks

Negative Changes

  • In EDS, the dueling field background changed to suit the Field Spell Card that was activated, while the background remains the same in this game
  • Sometimes the AI shows signs of "knowing" face down card

Dueling Decks

The player can assemble a deck and can duel against a variety of computer opponents. The game features the first 1,108 cards released in Japan. There are 29 opponents in the game. Each opponent has different skills and decks revolve around a certain theme (Yugi=Basic, Exodia Rare Hunter=Exodia, Yami Yugi (Dark Yugi)=Ultimate, etc.).

Game Mechanics

The game has a steep learning curve; when a duelist has at least one copy of all 1,108 cards, they can choose to ignore the Limited List. However, the stronger duelists don't follow the Limited list either. For example, Simon the Exodia duelist has three of each of the (UTC)Exodia parts in his deck, where normally a player may only have one. The AI is rather poor: if a player has a face-down monster with 2000 defence points, and the AI opponent has a monster with 1900 attack points, they will not attack as they "know" they cannot defeat the face-down monster. As well, an AI opponent will Tribute Summon as soon as possible, even tributing 1 monster to summon the exact same monster, or even a weaker monster than the original. Stronger duelists often have high requirements to be "unlocked" (available to duel): the final duelists in the game require the player have at least fifteen more wins than losses against every other duelist in the game.

External links


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