Yuba County, California: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yuba County, California
Seal of Yuba County, California
Map of California highlighting Yuba County
Location in the state of California
Map of the U.S. highlighting California
California's location in the U.S.
Seat Marysville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

644 sq mi (1,668 km²)

13 sq mi (34 km²), 2.03%
PopulationEst.
 - (2006)
 - Density

71,938
96/sq mi (37/km²)
Founded 1850
Website www.co.yuba.ca.us

Yuba County is located in the U.S. state of California's Central Valley, north of Sacramento, along the Feather River. As of 2006 its population was 71,938 [1]. The county seat is Marysville. Yuba County is part of the Greater Sacramento area.

Contents

History

Yuba County was one of the original counties of California, formed in 1850 at the time of statehood. Parts of the county's territory were given to Placer County in 1851, to Nevada County in 1851 and to Sierra County in 1852.

The county was named after the Yuba River by Captain John Sutter for the Native American village Yubu, Yupu or Juba near the confluence of the Yuba and Feather rivers. General Mariano Vallejo stated that the river was named Uba by an exploring expedition in 1824 because of the quantities of wild grapes (uvas silvestres in Spanish) which they found growing on its banks.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 644 square miles (1,667 km²), of which, 631 square miles (1,633 km²) of it is land and 13 square miles (34 km²) of it (2.03%) is water. The county lies along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, the steep slopes making it prime territory for the siting of hydroelectric power plants.

A portion of the county, where Marysville (the county seat) and most of the population lives, is west of the mountains on the valley floor. There is a great deal of agriculture business in this part of the county, especially fruit orchards, rice fields, and cattle grazing.[1]

Advertisements

Incorporated Cities towns, and communities

Other Towns and Communities

These are additional placenames in Yuba county. Some of these are viable communities, others are historic places that are now just a spot off the highway. Some of these are in the mountains, others in the valley. Many are old mining communities which have long since disappeared. Some of these locations have been integrated into larger, adjacent communities as the current rate of growth does not favor the small detached locale.

  • Alicia
  • Arboga
  • Browns Valley
  • Challenge
  • Dantoni
  • Dantoni Junction
  • Dobbins
  • Eagleville
  • East Arboga
  • Erle
  • Frenchtown
  • Hallwood
  • Hammonton
  • Horstville
  • Iowa City
  • Mello
  • Mounkes
  • North Star
  • Olive Hill
  • Oregon House
  • Ostrom
  • Pearson
  • Rackerby
  • Ramirez
  • Reed
  • Rupert
  • Sharon Valley
  • Sicard Flat
  • South Yuba
  • Spenceville (Spenceville Wildlife Area)
  • Stanfield Hill
  • Strawberry Valley
  • Sucker Flat
  • Tambo
  • Timbuctoo
  • Waldo
  • Waldo Junction
  • Weeds Point
  • Woodleaf

Adjacent counties

Ecology

National protected areas within Yuba County include portions of the Plumas National Forest and the Tahoe National Forest. In addition to these identified protected areas the county has extensive natural areas consisting of forestation, grassland, riparian area, grassland and other habitats. The county exhibits a considerable diversity of flowering plant species, among which is the Yellow Mariposa Lily, Calochortus luteus.[2]

Transportation Infrastructure

Major highways

Public transportation

Yuba Sutter Transit operates local bus service, as well as commuter runs to Downtown Sacramento. Greyhound buses stop in Marysville.

Airports

Yuba County Airport is located three miles (5 km) south of Marysville. It is a general aviation airport.

Higher education

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 60,219 people, 20,535 households, and 14,805 families residing in the county. The population density was 96 people per square mile (37/km²). There were 22,636 housing units at an average density of 36 per square mile (14/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 70.64% White, 3.16% Black or African American, 2.61% Native American, 7.50% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 9.95% from other races, and 5.94% from two or more races. 17.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 11.2% were of German, 10.4% American, 7.6% Irish and 7.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 78.8% spoke English, 13.2% Spanish and 4.7% Hmong as their first language.

There were 20,535 households out of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.34.

In the county the population was spread out with 31.0% under the age of 18, 10.7% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.4 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,460, and the median income for a family was $34,103. Males had a median income of $27,845 versus $21,301 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,124. About 16.3% of families and 20.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.6% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Presidential election results
Year GOP DEM Others
2004 67.0% 12,076 31.6% 5,687 1.5% 261
2000 61.0% 9,838 34.4% 5,546 4.6% 743
1996 51.5% 7,971 37.4% 5,789 11.1% 1,710
1992 43.4% 7,333 34.2% 5,785 22.4% 3,777
1988 61.4% 8,937 37.4% 5,444 1.3% 182
1984 63.5% 9,780 34.7% 5,339 1.8% 278
1980 56.3% 7,942 34.7% 4,896 9.0% 1,273
1976 44.7% 5,496 52.5% 6,451 2.8% 338
1972 57.0% 6,623 38.1% 4,435 4.9% 572
1968 48.2% 5,371 40.0% 4,461 11.8% 1,318
1964 42.3% 4,964 57.6% 6,766 0.1% 9
1960 51.7% 5,293 47.7% 4,882 0.6% 58

Yuba is a strongly Republican county in Presidential and congressional elections. The last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Jimmy Carter in 1976. Yuba is part of California's 2nd congressional district, which is held by Republican Wally Herger. In the state legislature Yuba is in the 3rd Assembly district, which is held by Republican Dan Logue, and the 4th Senate district, which is held by Republican Sam Aanestad.

Line notes

Sources

External links

Coordinates: 39°16′N 121°21′W / 39.27°N 121.35°W / 39.27; -121.35


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
Yuba County, California
Seal of Yuba County, California
Map
File:Map of California highlighting Yuba County.png
Location in the state of California
Map of the USA highlighting California
California's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1850
Seat Marysville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 2.03%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2006)
 - Density

71938
Website: www.co.yuba.ca.us

Yuba County is located in the U.S. state of California's Central Valley, north of Sacramento, along the Feather River. As of 2006 its population is 71,938 [1]. The county seat is Marysville.

Contents

History

Yuba County was one of the original counties of California, formed in 1850 at the time of statehood. Parts of the county's territory were given to Placer County in 1851, to Nevada County in 1851 and to Sierra County in 1852.

The county was named after the Yuba River by Captain John Sutter for the Native American village Yubu, Yupu or Juba near the confluence of the Yuba and Feather rivers. General Mariano Vallejo stated that the river was named Uba by an exploring expedition in 1824 because of the quantities of wild grapes (uvas silvestres in Spanish) which they found growing on its banks.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,667 km² (644 sq mi). 1,633 km² (631 sq mi) of it is land and 34 km² (13 sq mi) of it (2.03%) is water. The county lies along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, the steep slopes making it prime territory for the siting of hydroelectric power plants.

A portion of the county, where Marysville (the county seat) and most of the population lives, is west of the mountains on the valley floor. There is a great deal of agriculture business in this part of the county, especially fruit orchards, rice fields, and cattle grazing.

Incorporated Cities towns, and communities

Other Towns and Communities

These are additional placenames in Yuba county. Some of these are viable communities, others are historic places that are now just a spot off of the highway. Some of these are in the mountains, others in the valley. Many are old mining communities which have long since disappeared. Some of these locations have been integrated into larger, adjacent communities as the current rate of growth does not favor the small detached locale.

  • Alicia
  • Arboga
  • Browns Valley
  • Challenge
  • Dantoni
  • Dantoni Junction
  • Dobbins
  • Eagleville
  • East Arboga
  • Erle
  • Frenchtown
  • Hallwood
  • Hammonton
  • Horstville
  • Iowa City
  • Mello
  • Mounkes
  • North Star
  • Olive Hill
  • Oregon House
  • Ostrom
  • Pearson
  • Rackerby
  • Ramirez
  • Reed
  • Rupert
  • Sharon Valley
  • Sicard Flat
  • South Yuba
  • Spenceville (Spenceville Wildlife Area)
  • Stanfield Hill
  • Strawberry Valley
  • Sucker Flat
  • Tambo
  • Tumbuctoo
  • Waldo
  • Waldo Junction
  • Weeds Point
  • Woodleaf

Adjacent Counties

Transportation Infrastructure

Major highways

Public Transportation

Yuba Sutter Transit operates local bus service, as well as commuter runs to Downtown Sacramento. Greyhound buses stop in Marysville.

Airports

Yuba County Airport is located three miles south of Marysville. It is a general aviation airport.

Education

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 60,219 people, 20,535 households, and 14,805 families residing in the county. The population density was 37/km² (96/sq mi). There were 22,636 housing units at an average density of 14/km² (36/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 70.64% White, 3.16% Black or African American, 2.61% Native American, 7.50% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 9.95% from other races, and 5.94% from two or more races. 17.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 78.8% spoke English, 13.2% Spanish and 4.7% Hmong as their first language.

There were 20,535 households out of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.90% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.34.

In the county the population was spread out with 31.0% under the age of 18, 10.7% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 101.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.4 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,460, and the median income for a family was $34,103. Males had a median income of $27,845 versus $21,301 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,124. About 16.3% of families and 20.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.6% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Presidential election results
Year GOP DEM Others
2004 67.0% 12,076 31.6% 5,687 1.5% 261
2000 61.0% 9,838 34.4% 5,546 4.6% 743
1996 51.5% 7,971 37.4% 5,789 11.1% 1,710
1992 43.4% 7,333 34.2% 5,785 22.4% 3,777
1988 61.4% 8,937 37.4% 5,444 1.3% 182
1984 63.5% 9,780 34.7% 5,339 1.8% 278
1980 56.3% 7,942 34.7% 4,896 9.0% 1,273
1976 44.7% 5,496 52.5% 6,451 2.8% 338
1972 57.0% 6,623 38.1% 4,435 4.9% 572
1968 48.2% 5,371 40.0% 4,461 11.8% 1,318
1964 42.3% 4,964 57.6% 6,766 0.1% 9
1960 51.7% 5,293 47.7% 4,882 0.6% 58

Yuba is a strongly Republican county in Presidential and congressional elections. The last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Jimmy Carter in 1976. Yuba is part of California's 2nd congressional district, which is held by Republican Wally Herger. In the state legislature Yuba is in the 3rd Assembly district, which is held by Republican Rick Keene, and the 4th Senate district, which is held by Republican Sam Aanestad.


















External link

Coordinates: 39°16′N 121°21′W / 39.27, -121.35

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Yuba County, California. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Yuba County, CaliforniaRDF feed
County names Yuba County, California  +
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 California  +
Short name Yuba County  +

This article uses material from the "Yuba County, California" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message