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Yugoslav dinar
динар / dinar (Serbo-Croatian)
1 dinar (1965) 1000 dinara (1981)
1 dinar (1965) 1000 dinara (1981)
User(s) Yugoslavia Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia SFR Yugoslavia
 FR Yugoslavia
Subunit
1/100 para
Symbol din. and дин.
Plural The language(s) of this currency belong(s) to the Slavic languages. There is more than one way to construct plural forms. See article.
Coins 50 para, 1, 2, 5 dinara
Banknotes 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 5000 - 500 Billion dinara
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.

The dinar (Cyrillic script: динар) was the currency of the three Yugoslav states: the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (formerly the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes), the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia between 1918 and 2003. The dinar was subdivided into 100 para (Cyrillic script: пара).

There were eight distinct dinari, with hyperinflation in the early 1990s causing five revaluations between 1990 and 1994. Each of the eight has been given a distinguishing name and a separate ISO 4217 code.

Contents

History

Reforms of the Yugoslav dinar
Date Conversion Rate
January 1, 1966 100
January 1, 1990 10,000
July 1, 1992 10
October 1, 1993 1,000,000
January 1, 1994 1,000,000,000
January 24, 1994 ~13 million
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1918-1941; Serbian dinar, YUS

Until 1918, the dinar was the currency of Serbia. It then became the currency of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, circulating alongside the krone in Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, with 1 dinar = 4 kronen. The first coins and banknotes bearing the name of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes were issued in 1920, until which time Serbian coins and banknotes circulated. In 1929, the name of the country changed to Yugoslavia and this was reflected on the currency.

In 1931, an exchange rate of 56.4 dinara = 1 U.S. Dollar was set, which changed to 44 dinara in 1933. In 1937, a tourist exchange rate of 250 dinara = 1 British pound was established.

World War II (1941-1945)

In 1941, Yugoslavia was invaded and split up, with the dinar remaining currency in Nedić's Serbia as Serbian dinar). The kuna was introduced in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (Independent State of Croatia) at par with the dinar, whilst the Bulgarian lev, Italian lira and German Reichsmark circulated in those part of Yugoslavia occupied by these countries.

1944-1965; Federation dinar, YUF

In 1944, as Yugoslavia began to be reconstituted, the Yugoslav dinar replaced the Serbian dinar, Independent State of Croatia kuna and other occupation currencies, with the rates of exchanged being 1 Yugoslav dinar = 20 Serbian dinara = 40 kuna. In May 1945, a peg of 50 dinara = 1 U.S. dollar was established but was not maintained.

1966-1989; Hard dinar, YUD

On January 1, 1966, the first of five revaluations took place, at a ratio of 100 to 1. This currency was never very stable, suffering from an inflation rate of 15 to 25 percent per year [1]. In the late 1980s the inflation rate accelerated, causing the currency to be revalued at the beginning of 1990.

1990-1992; Convertible dinar, YUN

Coat of arms of the SFR Yugoslavia

The second revaluation took place in January 1, 1990, at a ratio of 10,000 to 1. During this period, the constituent republics began to leave the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Four of the six republics declared independence and issued their own currencies shortly after. This was the last dinar that bore the coat of arms and the name of the "Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" in multiple languages.

Country Currency Date Adopted Value
Bosnia and Herzegovina Dinar 1992-07 1 dinar of 1992
Croatia Dinar 1991-12-23 1 dinar of 1990
Macedonia Denar 1992-04-26 1 dinar of 1990
Slovenia Tolar 1991-10-08 1 dinar of 1990

Serbian enclaves in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina also issued currencies in dinar, equivalent to and revalued together with the Yugoslav dinar. These were the Krajina dinar and the Republika Srpska dinar.

1992-1993; Reformed dinar, YUR

The third revaluation took place on July 1, 1992, at a ratio of 10 to 1. Hyperinflation began to occur during this currency's period of circulation. This dinar was issued in the then Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, which consisted of the remaining republics of Serbia and Montenegro. (This federation split in 2006 and Montenegro currently uses the Euro as its currency, though it does not mint it.)

1993; October dinar, YUO

The fourth revaluation took place on October 1, 1993, at a ratio of 1 million to 1. This revaluation did not interrupt the hyperinflation and the currency lasted a mere three months.

1994; January dinar, YUG

The fifth revaluation took place on January 1, 1994, at a ratio of 1 billion (109) to 1. This currency suffered from the worst hyperinflation of all the dinar and was replaced within one month.

1994-2003; Novi dinar, YUM

On January 24, 1994, the novi dinar (nominative plural: novi dinari, Cyrillic script: нови динар, нови динари; genitive plural: novih dinara, Cyrillic: нових динара; novi means new) was introduced. This was not a revaluation of the dinar. Instead, the novi dinar was pegged at par to the Deutsche Mark. On the day of the introduction of the novi dinar, the exchange rate of the previous dinar to the Deutsche Mark, and, hence, to the novi dinar, was approximately 1 DM = 13 million dinara. Despite not being pegged to the newest currency, the previous dinar did not fall further in value, remaining at about 12 million "1994" dinar to the novi dinar.[2] The overall impact of the hyperinflation was that 1 novi dinar equalled approximately 1.2 × 1027 third (hard) dinara from before 1990, 1.2 × 1029 Federation dinara, or 2.4  × 1030 pre-war dinara. The "novi" portion of the name was abandoned in 2000.

Replacement of the dinar

On November 6, 1999, Montenegro decided that, besides the Yugoslav dinar, the Deutsche Mark would also be an official currency. On November 13, 2000, the dinar was dropped and the Deutsche Mark (by that time defined in terms of the euro) became the only currency. In 2003, the end of Yugoslavia led to the dinar, by then only used in Serbia, being replaced at par by the Serbian dinar.

Coins

1918 dinar

In 1920, the first coins were minted in the name of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. They were zinc 5 and 10 para and nickel-bronze 25 para. These were followed, in 1925, by nickel-bronze 50 para, 1 and 2 dinara. From 1931, coins were minted in the name of Yugoslavia, starting with silver 10 and 20 dinara, followed by silver 50 dinara in 1932. In 1938, aluminium-bronze 50 para, 1 and 2 dinara, nickel 10 dinara and reduced size, silver 20 and 50 dinara were introduced. These were the last coins issued before the Second World War.

1944 dinar

In 1945, zinc 50 para, 1, 2 and 5 dinara were introduced, followed in 1953 by aluminium coins for the same denominations. In 1955, aluminium-bronze 10, 20 and 50 dinara were added.

1966 dinar

Selection coins (Front)
Selection coins (Reverse)
5 para coin, 1965

In 1966, brass 5, 10, 20 and 50 para, and cupro-nickel 1 dinar coins (dated 1965) were introduced. In 1971, nickel-brass 2 and 5 dinara were introduced, followed by cupro-nickel 10 dinara in 1976. Production of 5, 10 and 20 para coins ceased in 1981, with bronze 25 and 50 para being introduced the following year. Nickel-brass 20, 50 and 100 dinara were introduced in 1985 and production of all coins less than 10 dinara stopped the next year. In 1988, brass 10, 20, 50 and 100 dinara were introduced. These four coins were issued until 1989.

1990 dinar

In 1990, coins for 10, 20 and 50 para, 1, 2 and 5 dinara were introduced. The highest two denominations were minted in small numbers in 1992, the other denominations having ceased production in 1991.

1992 dinar

Coins were issued for this currency in 1992 in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 50 dinara. The 1, 2 and 5 dinara were bronze, whilst the 10 and 50 dinara were nickel-brass. The coins bore the state title "Yugoslavia" (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet and Југославија in Cyrillic) in its simplest form without any modifier.

1993 dinar

Coins were issued in 1993 in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 50 dinara struck in nickel-brass, and 100 dinara struck in brass. Brass 500 dinara coins were also struck but not issued, most being remelted. The design of these coins was similar to that of coins of the fifth dinar, except that the sixth dinar coins bore the state title "FR Yugoslavia" (SR Jugoslavija in Latin and СР Југославија in Cyrillic).

1994 dinar

Only one coin type was struck for this short-lived currency, a brass 1 dinar.

Novi dinar

In 1994, brass 1 and 5 para, and nickel-brass 10 and 50 para, and 1 novi dinar were introduced. In 2000 the word novi was dropped from the currency and new, brass 50 para, 1, 2 and 5 dinara coins were introduced.

Banknotes

1918 dinar

In 1920, the National Bank of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes issued notes for 10, 100 and 1000 dinara.

1920-1926 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
10-Dinara-1920.jpg 10 dinara Blue man with a wheel 1920
10-Dinara-1926.jpg Red a woman coat of arms, silhouette of a church 1926
100-Dinara-1920.jpg 100 dinara Yellow a woman ships and a peasant 1920
1000-Dinara-1920.jpg 1000 dinara Violet Saint George and the Dragon man ploughing, different cities
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

Following the change of the country's name to Yugoslavia in 1929, modified 10 and 100 dinara notes were issued, followed by new 1000 dinara notes in 1931 and 500 dinara notes in 1935.

1929-1939 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
10-dinara-1939.jpg 10 dinara Green King Peter
Old Bridge in Mostar
a woman 1939
20-Dinara-1936.jpg 20 dinara Brown King Peter a womam 1936
50-Dinara-1931.jpg 50 dinara Brown King Aleksandar a horsman statue 1931
YugoslaviaP27b-100Dinara-1929 f.jpg 100 dinara Violet a woman with sword ships and a peasant 1929
100-Dinara-1934.jpg a woman and a soldier two working women 1934
500-Dinara-1935.jpg 500 dinara Blue King Peter women working 1935
1000-dinara-1931.jpg 1000 dinara Yellow Queen Maria two women, one with a sickle and wheat, another with sword and shield 1931
1000-Dinara-1935.jpg three horsemen and a woman
a teacher and a pupil
a fisherman and a blacksmith 1935
10000-Dinara-1936.jpg 10,000 dinara Brown King Peter two farm workers 1936
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

1944 dinar

In 1944, the Democratic Federation of Yugoslavia issued notes for 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 dinara.

1944 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
1-dinar-1944.jpg 1 dinar partisan coat of arms
indication of value
1944
5-Dinara-1944.jpg 5 dinara blue
10-DINARA-1944.jpg 10 dinara pink
20-dinara-1944.jpg 20 dinara red
50-dinara-1944.jpg 50 dinara dark blue
100-dinara-1944.jpg 100 dinara dark green
500-dinara-1944.jpg 500 dinara brown
1000-dinara-1944.jpg 1000 dinara green
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

These were followed in 1946 by notes of the National Bank of the Federal People's Republic for 50, 100, 500 and 1000 dinara. 5000 dinara notes were introduced in 1950.

1946-1950 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
50-Dinara-1946.jpg 50 dinara Yellow a miner a lumberjack 1946
100-Dinara-1946.jpg 100 dinara Brown a blacksmith and a harvester a fisherman
500-Dinara-1946.jpg 500 dinara Brown a partisan farmer ploughing
1000din-1946.jpg 1000 dinara Brown working woman waterfall and a figure of a woman with a sword
5000-Dinara-1950.jpg 5000 dinara Dark blue a ship in the harbour steel mill workers 1950
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

The new banknotes were issued in 1955.

1955-1963 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
Jugoslavia-100-dinara-1963.jpg 100 dinara Red a woman Dubrovnik 1955
Yug074 f.JPG 500 dinara Green woman with sickle harvest
1000din-1963.jpg 1000 dinara Brown Arif Heralić a factory
5000-Dinara-1955.jpg 5000 dinara Dark blue Relief by Ivan Meštrović at the Federal Parliament building Federal Parliament building
10000-Dinara-1963.jpg 10,000 dinara Red The Monument of Peace by Antun Augustinčić in New York in front of the UN Building peace dove 1963
50000-Dinara-1963.jpg 50,000 dinara Green Statue of Nikola Tesla (in the Niagara Falls State Park) by Frano Kršinić
background: the spiral coil of his high-frequency transformer at East Houston Street, New York
hydro plant
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

1966 dinar

In 1966, banknotes (dated 1965) were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 50 and 100 dinara. They used the same obverse design as the 1955-1963 notes. 500 dinara notes were added in 1970, followed by 20 and 1000 dinara in 1974.

1965-1981 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
5-Dinara-1965f.jpg 5-Dinara-1965b.jpg 5 dinara 123 x 59 mm Green Woman with sickle tractors 1965
YUD 5 1968 obverse.jpg YUD 5 1968 reverse.jpg Indication of value 1968
10-Dinara-1965.jpg -10Dinara-1965-donatedmjd b.jpg 10 dinara 131 x 62 mm Brown Arif Heralić a factory 1965
YUD 10 1981 obverse.jpg YUD 10 1981 reverse.jpg Indication of value 1968
YUD 20 1974 obverse.jpg YUD 20 1974 reverse.jpg 20 dinara 139 x 65 mm Violet Ship dockside Indication of value 1974
50-Dinara-1965f.jpg 50-Dinara-1965b.jpg 50 dinara 140 x 66 mm Blue Relief by Ivan Meštrović at the Parliament building in Belgrade Federal Parliament Building 1965
YUD 50 1968 obverse.jpg YUD 50 1968 reverse.jpg Indication of value 1968
YUD 100 1986 obverse.jpg YUD 100 1986 reverse.jpg 100 dinara 148 x 70 mm Red The Monument of Peace by Antun Augustinčić (1900 – 1979) in New York in front of the main UN building. 1965
YUD 500 1981 obverse.jpg YUD 500 1981 reverse.jpg 500 dinara 156 x 74 mm Dark green 1970
YUD 1000 1981 obverse.jpg YUD 1000 1981 reverse.jpg 1000 dinara 164 x 78 mm Dark blue Woman with fruits 1974
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

In 1985, a new series of notes began with the introduction of 5000 dinara notes featuring a portrait of the late President Tito. As the inflation worsened, banknotes for 20,000 dinara were introduced in 1987, followed by 50,000 dinara in 1988 and 100,000, 500,000, 1 million and 2 million dinara in 1989. The 500,000 and 2 million dinara notes were unusual in that they did not feature a portrait but an image of the monument on Kozara.

1985-1989 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
Dinar 5000 s.jpg 5,000 dinara Violet Josip Broz Tito Jajce 1985
20000 dinara.jpg 20,000 dinara Brown Alija Sirotanović Mining equipment 1987
50000-Dinara-1988.jpg 50,000 dinara Green a woman Dubrovnik 1988
Dinar 100 000a.JPG 100,000 dinar Red a girl various letters and numerals 1989
500000-Dinara-1989.JPG 500,000 dinara Violet Battle of Kozara Memorial Battle of Sutjeska Memorial
1Million-Dinara-1989.jpg 1,000,000 dinara Brown a young woman a spike of wheat
2Million-Dinara-1989.jpg 2,000,000 dinara Purple Battle of Kozara Memorial "Broken wings" monument in Šumarice
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

1990 dinar

In 1990, notes were introduced for 10, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 dinara, some of which had designs very similar to those used for the corresponding notes of the previous currency. In 1991, 5000 dinara notes were added.

1990-1991 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
10-dinara-1990.jpg 10 dinara red a girl various letters and numerals 1990
10-Dinara-1991f.jpg violet 1991
50-Dinara-1990.jpg 50 dinara violet Battle of Kozara memorial Battle of the Sutjeska Memorial 1990
50dinara 01.06.1990.jpg purple a boy flowers
50-Dinara-1991f.jpg red 1991
100-Dinara-1990f.jpg 100 dinara brown young woman spike of wheat 1990
100-dinara-1991.jpg dark green 1991
200-dianara-1990.jpg 200 dinara dark green and red Battle of Kozara memorial "Broken wings" monument in Šumarice 1990
500-Dinara-1990f.jpg 500 dinara blue young man mountain
500-dinara-1991.jpg brown 1991
1000-dinara-1990.jpg 1000 dinara orange Nikola Tesla Tesla coil 1990
1000-dinara-1991.jpg blue 1991
5000-dinara-1991.jpg 5000 dinara violet Ivo Andrić Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

1992 dinar

In 1992, notes for 100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000 and 50,000 dinara were introduced. Again, designs modified from the previous series of notes were used but this time not in order that notes of equal value had similar designs. In 1993, higher value notes were introduced for 100,000, 500,000, 1 million, 5 million, 10 million, 50 million, 100 million, 500 million, 1 milliard (billion) and 10 milliard dinara.

1992-1993 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
100-dinara-1992.jpg 100 dinara Blue a young woman a spike of wheat 1992
500-Dinara-1992.jpg 500 dinara Pink a young man mountain
1000-din-1992.jpg 1000 dinara Red Nikola Tesla Tesla coil
5000-din-1992.jpg 5,000 dinara Dark green Ivo Andric Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge
10-000-dinara-1992.jpg 10,000 dinara Brown a girl various letters and numerals
YugoslaviaP117-50000Dinara-1992 f.JPG 50,000 dinara Green a boy flowers
100-000-dinara-1993.jpg 100,000 dinara Yellow a young woman a spike of wheat 1993
YUD 500000 1993 obverse.jpg 500,000 dinara Violet a young man mountain
1000000-Dinara-1993.jpg 1 Million dinara Violet a boy flowers
5000000-Dinara-1993.JPG 5 Million dinara Blue and dark red Nikola Tesla Tesla coil and a hydro power plant
10000000-dinara-1993.jpg 10 Million dinara Dark green Ivo Andrić National Library of Serbia
50000000-Dinara-1993.jpg 50 Million dinara Red a girl Captain Miša's Mansion
100-000-000-dinara-1993.jpg 100 Million dinara Light blue a young man Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts
500million-Dinara-1993.jpg 500 Million dinara Violet a young woman Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Belgrade
1billion-dinara-1993.JPG 1 Billion dinara Pink a girl Federal Parliament
10mlrd-dinara-1993.jpg 10 Billion dinara Pink Nikola Tesla Tesla coil
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

1993 dinar

Banknotes for this currency were issued in denominations of 5000, 10,000, 50,000, 500,000, 1 million, 5 million, 50 million, 500 million, 5 billion, 50 billion and 500 billion. The unusual sequence of denominations was caused by the hyperinflation Yugoslavia was suffering from.

1993 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
5000-dinara-1993-.jpg 5,000 dinara Brown Nikola Tesla Nikola Tesla Museum 1993
10-000-dinara-1993.jpg 10,000 dinara Red and green Vuk Karadžić Tršić and Tronoša
50-000-dinara-1993.jpg 50,000 dinara Violet Petar Petrović Njegoš Cetinje monastery
500000-Dinara-1993.jpg 500,000 dinara Green Dositej Obradović Hopovo monastery
5Million-Dinara-1993.jpg 5,000,000 dinara Brown and blue Karađorđe Church and mansion of Karađorđe
50Million-Dinara-1993.jpg 50,000,000 dinara Red Mihajlo Pupin Telephone Exchange building
500Million-Dinara-1993.jpg 500,000,000 dinara Blue Jovan Cvijić Captain Miša's Mansion
5Billion-Dinara-1993.jpg 5,000,000,000 dinara Brown Đura Jakšić Vraćevšnica monastery
50Billion-dinara-1993.JPG 50,000,000,000 dinara Red and blue Miloš Obrenović Prince Miloš's Residence
500000000000 dinars.jpg 500,000,000,000 dinara Dark red Jovan Jovanović Zmaj National Library of Serbia
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

1994 dinar

In January, 1994, notes were issued for 10, 100, 1000, 5000, 50,000, 500,000 and 10 million dinara. They circulated for just a few weeks before the currency was abandoned in favour of the novi dinar. 10 and 100 dinar notes were characteristic for lack of serial number on them.

1994 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
10-Dinara-1994.jpg 10 dinara Green Josif Pancic mountain 1994
Originalslika-100-dinara-1994-UNC-513112.jpg 100 dinara Blue and red Nikola Tesla Nikola Tesla Museum
1000-dinara-1994.jpg 1000 dinara Violet and red Petar Petrović Njegoš Cetinje monastery
5000-Dinara-1994.jpg 5000 dinara Blue and violet Dositej Obradović Hopovo monastery
50-000-din-1994.jpg 50,000 dinara Red Karađorđe Church and mension of Karađorđe
500000-Dinara-1994 f.jpg 500,000 dinara Yellow Jovan Cvijic Captain Miša's Mansion
10000000-Dinara-1994.JPG 10,000,000 dinara
(1993 banknote overprinted with "1994")
Dark green Ivo Andric National Library of Serbia
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

Novi dinar

On January 24, 1994, notes were introduced for 1, 5 and 10 novih (new) dinara. A second series of notes was introduced later in the year for 5, 10 and 20 novih dinara, with 50 and 100 novih dinara notes added in 1996.

1994–1996 "Novi dinar" Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
1-novi-dinar-1994.jpg 1 novi dinar Brown and blue Josif Pancic mountain 1994
5NovihDinara-1994.jpg 5 novih dinara Red Nikola Tesla Nikola Tesla Museum
5-novih-dinara-1994.jpg Violet
10NovihDinara-1994-1.jpg 10 novih dinara Violet Petar Petrovic Njegos Cetinje monastery
10NewDinars-1994-2.jpg Brown
20-novih-dinara-1994.jpg 20 novih dinara Dark green and brown Djura Jaksic Vraćevšnica monastery
50-novih-dinara-1996.jpg 50 novih dinara Green Milos Obrenovic Prince Miloš's Residence 1996
100-dinara-1996.jpg 100 novih dinara Dark green Dositej Obradovic Hopovo monastery
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

In 2000, new notes without the word "novih" were issued in denominations of 10, 20, 50 and 100 dinara. 200 and 1000 dinara notes were introduced in 2001, followed by 5000 dinara in 2002.

2000–2002 Series
Image Value Dimensions Colour Obverse Reverse First printed date
10-Dinara-2000.jpg 10 dinara Ochre-yellow Vuk Karadžić
Filip Višnjić in the background
Figure of Vuk Karadžić
Members of the First Slavic Congress held in Prague in 1848
Vignette of the letters Vuk introduced
2000
20-Dinara-2000.jpg 20 dinara Green Petar Petrović Njegoš Statue of Njegoš from the Njegoš's mausoleum
Mount Lovćen
50-Dinara-2000.jpg 50 dinara Purple Stevan Mokranjac
A piano
Figure of Mokranjac
A motif of Miroslav Gospels illumination scores
Notes
100-Dinara-2000.jpg 100 dinara Blue Nikola Tesla
Definition of tesla, a unit of magnetic flux density
Portrait of Nikola Tesla
A detail from the Tesla's AC motor
200-Dinara-2001.jpg 200 dinara Brown Nadežda Petrović
Statue of Nadežda Petrović
Silhouette of the Gračanica Monastery
Figure of Nadežda Petrović
Gračanica Monastery
2001
1000-Dinara-2001.jpg 1000 dinara Red Đorđe Vajfert
An outline of Vajfert's brewery

Portrait of Vajfert
Hologram image of St. George and the Dragon
Details from the interior of the old building of the National Bank of Yugoslavia

5000-Dinara-2002.jpg 5000 dinara Purple and green

Slobodan Jovanović
Ornamental detail from the building of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts

Portrait of Slobodan Jovanović
Silhouette of the National Parliament

2002
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre, a standard for world banknotes.

The current Serbian dinar banknotes use almost the same design as the 2000–2002 Yugoslav notes. The main difference is that the words Narodna Banka Jugoslavije (National Bank of Yugoslavia) are changed to Narodna Banka Srbije (National Bank of Serbia) and the coat of arms of Serbia and Montenegro is changed to Serbian coat of arms.

See also

References

External links

KSCS/Yugoslav dinar (1918–1941)
Preceded by:
Serbian dinar
Location: Serbia
Reason: creation of Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes
Ratio: 1 KSCS dinar=1 Serbian dinar
Currency of Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes
1918 – 1929
Currency of Kingdom of Yugoslavia
1929 – 1941
Succeeded by:
Serbian dinar
Location: Serbia without its southern and northern portions
Reason: occupation by Germany
Ratio: at par
Succeeded by:
Croatian kuna
Location: Independent State of Croatia
Reason: indepedence
Ratio: at par
Succeeded by:
Italian lira
Location: Montenegro, Italy annexed portion of Slovenia
Reason: Italian occupation
Preceded by:
Yugoslav krone
Location: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Slovenia
Reason: incorporation of previously Austro-Hungarian provinces into Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes
Ratio: 1 dinar=4 kronen
Succeeded by:
German Reichsmark
Location: Nazi Germany annexed portion of Slovenia
Reason: annexation by Germany
Succeeded by:
Hungarian pengő
Location: Backa, Medimurje, Prekmurje
Reason: annexation by Hungary
Preceded by:
Montenegrin perper
Location: Montenegro
Reason: incorporation into Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes
Ratio: 1 dinar=1 perper
Succeeded by:
Bulgarian lev
Location: Eastern Macedonia
Reason: Annexation by Bulgaria
Succeeded by:
Albanian lek
Location: Kosovo and Western Macedonia
Reason: annexation by Albania
Yugoslav dinar (1944–1966)
Preceded by:
Serbian dinar
Location: Serbia without its southern and northern portions
Reason: reunification as a result of World War II
Ratio: 1 Yugoslav dinar=20 Serbian dinara
Currency of Democratic Federal Yugoslavia
1944 – 1946
Currency of Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia
1946 – 1963
Currency of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
1963 – 1965
Succeeded by:
1966 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1966)=100 dinara (1944)
Preceded by:
Croatian kuna
Location: Independent State of Croatia
Reason: reunification as a result of World War II
Ratio: 1 dinar=40 kuna
Preceded by:
Italian lira
Location: Montenegro
Reason: re-integration to Yugoslavia
Preceded by:
German Reichsmark
Location: Slovenia
Reason: re-integration to Yugoslavia
Preceded by:
Hungarian pengő
Location: Backa, Medimurje, Prekmurje
Reason: re-integration to Yugoslavia
Preceded by:
Bulgarian lev
Location: Eastern Macedonia
Reason: re-integration to Yugoslavia
Preceded by:
Albanian lek
Location: Kosovo and Western Macedonia
Reason: reunification as a result of World War II and end of Albanian occupation
Yugoslav dinar (1966–1990)
Preceded by:
1944 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1966)=100 dinara (1944)
Currency of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
1966 – 1990
Succeeded by:
1990 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1990)=10,000 dinara (1966),
7 dinara (1990)=1 Deutsche Mark
Yugoslav dinar (1990–1992)
Preceded by:
1966 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1990)=10,000 dinara (1966),
7 dinara (1990)=1 Deutsche Mark
Currency of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
1990 – 1991 and 1992
Note: various dates of independence and introduction of independent currencies
Succeeded by:
1992 dinar
Location: Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)
Ratio: 1 dinar (1992)=10 dinara (1990)
Note: July, 1992
Succeeded by:
Bosnia and Herzegovina dinar
Location: Bosnia and Herzegovina except for Republika Srpska
Reason: independence
Ratio: 1 B&H dinar=10 dinara (1990)
Note: independence in March, 1992,
new currency in July, 1992
Succeeded by:
Republika Srpska dinar
Location: Republika Srpska (part of Bosnia)
Ratio: 1 Republika Srpska dinar=10 dinara (1990)
Note: independence in November, 1991,
new currency on July, 1992, and remained at par with Yugoslav dinar
Succeeded by:
Croatian dinar
Location: Croatia except for Republic of Serbian Krajina
Ratio: at par
Note: independence on June 25, 1991,
new currency on December 23, 1991
Succeeded by:
Krajina dinar
Location: Republic of Serbian Krajina (part of Croatia)
Ratio: 1 Krajina dinar=10 dinara (1990)
Note: independence on December 19, 1991,
new currency on July, 1992, and remained at par with Yugoslav dinar
Succeeded by:
Macedonian denar
Location: Macedonia
Ratio: at par
Note: independence on September 8, 1991,
new currency on April 26, 1992
Succeeded by:
Slovenian tolar
Location: Slovenia
Ratio: at par
Note: independence on June 25, 1991,
new currency on October 8, 1991
Yugoslav dinar (1992–1993)
Preceded by:
1990 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1992)=10 dinara (1990)
Currency of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
July 1992 – September 30, 1993
Succeeded by:
1993 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1993)=1,000,000 dinara (1992)
Yugoslav dinar (1993–1994)
Preceded by:
1992 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1993)=1,000,000 dinara (1992)
Currency of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
October 1, 1993 – December 31, 1993
Succeeded by:
1994 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1994)=1,000,000,000 dinara (1993)
Yugoslav dinar (January 1994)
Preceded by:
1993 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1994)=1,000,000,000 dinara (1993)
Currency of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Republika Srpska
January 1, 1994 – January 23, 1994
Succeeded by:
Novi dinar
Ratio: 1 Novi dinar=1 German mark=about 10~13 million dinara (1994)
Preceded by:
Republika Srpska 1993 dinar
Ratio: 1 dinar (1994)=1,000,000,000 dinara (1993)
Yugoslav novi dinar (1994–2003)
Preceded by:
1994 dinar
Ratio: 1 novi dinar=1 German mark=12,000,000 dinara (1994)
Currency of Serbia except Kosovo (as part of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
January 24, 1994 – July 2, 2003
Succeeded by:
Serbian dinar
Reason: name changed to Serbia and Montenegro (on February 4, 2003)
Ratio: at par
Currency of Montenegro (as part of Yugoslavia), Kosovo (as part of Serbia)
January 24, 1994 – 1999
Succeeded by:
German mark
Reason: political and economic reasons
Currency of Republika Srpska
January 24, 1994 – 1998
Succeeded by:
Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark
Reason: Dayton Agreement

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