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Zack Taylor
Catcher
Born: July 27, 1898(1898-07-27)
Yulee, Florida
Died: September 19, 1974 (aged 76)
Orlando, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
June 15, 1920 for the Brooklyn Robins
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1935 for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Career statistics
Batting average     .261
Home runs     9
Runs batted in     311
Teams

As Player:

As Manager:

Career highlights and awards

James Wren Taylor, better known as "Zack" (July 27, 1898 - September 19, 1974), was an American Major League Baseball catcher with the Brooklyn Robins, Boston Braves, New York Giants, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, and again with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

The native of Yulee, Florida, joined the St. Louis Browns as a coach, and when Luke Sewell resigned as manager in 1946, Taylor finished out the season. After a disastrous 1947 campaign, Browns general manager Bill DeWitt re-hired him as manager. He lost 100 games in two of his five seasons as manager, and after the 1951 season, he was fired. Taylor also coached for Brooklyn and the Pittsburgh Pirates, and remained active in baseball as a scout until his death in Orlando, Florida, in 1974.

Taylor was the St. Louis skipper who, upon orders from then-owner Bill Veeck, sent Eddie Gaedel to the plate on August 19, 1951 against Bob Cain and the Detroit Tigers. He also participated in another Veeck stunt, in which the Browns handed out placards - reading take, swing, bunt, etc. - to fans and allowed them to make managerial decisions for a day. Taylor dutifully surveyed the fans' advice and relayed the sign accordingly. The Browns won the game.

External links

Preceded by
Luke Sewell
Muddy Ruel
St. Louis Browns Manager
1946
1948-1951
Succeeded by
Muddy Ruel
Rogers Hornsby
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