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春秋左氏傳.jpg

The Zuo Zhuan (Chinese: 左傳Wade-Giles: Tso Chuan, pinyin: zuǒ zhuàn), translated as the Chronicle of Zuo or the Commentary of Zuo, is the earliest Chinese work of narrative history and covers the period from 722 BCE to 468 BCE. It was traditionally attributed to Zuo Qiuming, as a commentary to the Spring and Autumn Annals, although many scholars believe it was an independent work that corresponded chronologically to the Annals and was later spliced into it. Most notable modern scholars of this book, such as Yang Bojun (楊伯峻) hold that the work was compiled during the period of Warring States, and given the compilation of the date no later than 389 BCE. It is one of the most important sources for understanding the history during the Spring and Autumn period.

The book also contains the earliest reference to weiqi (the go board game) under the section of 25th Year of Duke Xiang of Lu in Gregorian year of 548 BCE.

With its vivid and concise language, Zuo Zhuan is also a gem of classical Chinese prose. This work and Shiji were regarded as the ultimate models by many generations of prose stylists in ancient China.

Contents

The Zuozhuan is organized according to the reigns of the various dukes of Lu.

Duke Xuan of Lu 鲁宣公 to 590 BCE Duke Cheng of Lu 鲁成公 590 BCE to 573 BCE

References

  • Yang Bojun (1990). The Annotation of Zuozhuan Chunqiu: On Preface. Beijing: Zhonghua Shuju. ISBN 7-101-00262-5.  
  • Burton Watson (1989). The Tso chuan : selections from China's oldest narrative history. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-06714-3.  

External links

  • Zuo Zhuan Fully searchable text (Chinese)
  • The Zuozhuan Digital Concordance. by St. John Page and Isabel García Hidalgo, the English data is based on the full translation published by the 19th century English sinologist-missionary James Legge. Missing sections not covered by Legge were translated by Page and added to cover the full text.
This article contains Chinese text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Chinese characters.







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