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A
Basic Latin alphabet
Aa Bb Cc Dd    
Ee Ff Gg Hh
Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn
Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt
Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz

The letter A is the first letter in the Latin alphabet, a vowel. Its name in English (pronounced /ˈeɪ/) is spelled ‹a›; the plural is aes, although this is rare.[1]

Contents

Origins

"A" can be traced to a pictogram of an ox head in Egyptian hieroglyph or the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet.[2]

Egyptian Proto-Semitic
ox's head
Phoenician
aleph
Greek
Alpha
Etruscan
A
Roman
A
Egyptian hieroglyphic ox head Proto-semitic ox head Phoenician aleph Greek alpha Etruscan A Roman A

In 1600 B.C. the Phoenician alphabet's letter had a linear form that served as the base for some later forms. Its name must have corresponded closely to the Hebrew or Arabic aleph.

Blackletter A
Blackletter A
Uncial A
Uncial A
Another Capital A
Another Blackletter A 
Modern Roman A
Modern Roman A
Modern Italic A
Modern Italic A
Modern Script A
Modern Script A

When the Ancient Greeks adopted the alphabet, they had no use for the glottal stop that the letter had denoted in Phoenician and other Semitic languages, so they used the sign to represent the vowel /a/, and kept its name with a minor change (alpha). In the earliest Greek inscriptions after the Greek Dark Ages, dating to the 8th century BC, the letter rests upon its side, but in the Greek alphabet of later times it generally resembles the modern capital letter, although many local varieties can be distinguished by the shortening of one leg, or by the angle at which the cross line is set.

The Etruscans brought the Greek alphabet to their civilization in the Italian Peninsula and left the letter unchanged. The Romans later adopted the Etruscan alphabet to write the Latin language, and the resulting letter was preserved in the modern Latin alphabet used to write many languages, including English.

Typographic variants include a double-story and single-story a.

The letter has two minuscule (lower-case) forms. The form used in most current handwriting consists of a circle and vertical stoke ("ɑ"), called Latin alpha or "script a". Most printed material uses a form consisting of a small loop with an arc over it ("a"). Both derive from the majuscule (capital) form. In Greek handwriting, it was common to join the left leg and horizontal stroke into a single loop, as demonstrated by the Uncial version shown. Many fonts then made the right leg vertical. In some of these, the serif that began the right leg stroke developed into an arc, resulting in the printed form, while in others it was dropped, resulting in the modern handwritten form.

Usage

In English, "a" by itself frequently denotes the near-open front unrounded vowel (/æ/) as in pad, the open back unrounded vowel (/ɑː/) as in father, or, in concert with a later orthographic vowel, the diphthong /eɪ/ as in ace and major, due to effects of the great vowel shift.

In most other languages that use the Latin alphabet, "a" denotes an open central unrounded vowel (/a/). In the International Phonetic Alphabet, variants of "a" denote various vowels. In X-SAMPA, capital "A" denotes the open back unrounded vowel and lowercase "a" denotes the open front unrounded vowel.

"A" is the third common used letter in English, and the second most common in Spanish and French. In one study, on average, about 3.68% of letters used in English tend to be ‹a›s, while the number is 6.22% in Spanish and 3.95% in French.[3]

"A" is often used to denote something or someone of a better or more prestigious quality or status: A-, A or A+, the best grade that can be assigned by teachers for students' schoolwork; A grade for clean restaurants; A-List celebrities, etc. Such associations can have a motivating effect as exposure to the letter A has been found to improve performance, when compared with other letters.[4]

A turned "a" ("ɐ") is used by the International Phonetic Alphabet for the near-open central vowel, while a turned capital "A" ("∀") is used in predicate logic to specify universal quantification.

Alternative representations of A
NATO phonetic Morse code
Alpha ·–
ICS Alpha.svg Semaphore Alpha.svg ⠁
Signal flag Flag semaphore Braille

Codes for computing

In Unicode the capital "A" is codepoint U+0043 and the lower case "a" is U+0067.[5]

The ASCII code for capital "A" is 65 and for lower case "a" is 97; or in binary 01000001 and 01100001, respectively.

The EBCDIC code for capital "A" is 193 and for lowercase "a" is 129.

The numeric character references in HTML and XML are "A" and "a" for upper and lower case, respectively.

See also

References

  1. ^ "A" Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989). Aes is the plural of the name of the letter. The plural of the letter itself is As, A's, as, a's.
  2. ^ "A". The World Book Encyclopedia. 1. Field Enterprises, Inc. 1956. p. 1. 
  3. ^ "Percentages of Letter frequencies per Thousand words". http://starbase.trincoll.edu/~crypto/resources/LetFreq.html. Retrieved 2006-05-01. 
  4. ^ Letters affect exam results, British Psychological Society, 09 March 2010, http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20100903-20689.html 
  5. ^ "Javascript Unicode Chart" (in en). http://macchiato.com/unicode/chart/. Retrieved 2009-03-08. 

External links

The basic modern Latin alphabet
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
Letter A with diacritics

history palaeography derivations diacritics punctuation numerals Unicode list of letters ISO/IEC 646



Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

The Universal Character Set
Letter a.svg
Unicode name LATIN SMALL LETTER A
Basic Latin U+0061

Contents

Translingual

Wikisource
See also the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica's article on:
A.

Etymology 1

Approximate form of Greek upper case Α (a, “alpha”) that was the source for both common variants of a Modification of capital letter A, from Latin A from Ancient Greek letter Α (A).

Pronunciation

  • (letter, most languages): IPA: /ɑː/, /a/

Letter

a lower case (upper case A)

  1. The first letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.

Symbol

a

  1. Used in the International Phonetic Alphabet and in several romanization systems of non-Latin scripts to represent an open central unrounded vowel (IPA: /a/)

See also

External links

Etymology 2

  • From atto-, from Danish and Norwegian atten (eighteen).

Symbol

a

  1. atto-, the prefix for 10-18 by the International System of Units.

Etymology 3

From Latin annus

Symbol

a

  1. A year in SI Units, specifically a Julian year or exactly 365.25 days.

Other representations of A:


English

Most common English words: little « now « then « #79: a » should » can » made

Etymology 1

Runic letter ᚫ (a), “‘ansuz’”), source for Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letters replaced by a

From Middle English and Old English lower case letter a and split of Middle English and Old English lower case letter æ.

  • Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter ᚪ (a), “‘āc’”) Old English lower case letter a from 7th century replacement by Latin lower case letter a of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter  (a), āc), derived from Runic letter  (a), Ansuz).
  • Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter ᚫ (æ), “‘æsc’”) Old English lower case letter æ from 7th century replacement by Latin lower case ligature æ of the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc letter  (æ), æsc), also derived from Runic letter  (a), Ansuz).

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • (letter name)
    The current pronunciation is a comparatively modern sound, and has taken the place of what, till about the early part of the 17th century, was similar to that in other languages.
  • (phoneme) IPA: /æ/, /ɑː/, /eɪ/, ...

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. The first letter of the English alphabet.
Usage notes

In English, the letter a by usually denotes the near-open front unrounded vowel (IPA: /æ/), as in pad, the open back unrounded vowel (IPA: /ɑː/) as in father, or, followed by another vowel, the diphthong IPA: /eɪ/, as in ace.

a is the third-most common letter in English.

Derived terms
See also
  • Next letter: b

Noun

Singular
a

Plural
aes

a (plural aes)

  1. The name of the letter A.
  2. (often capitalized) The best grade; superiority.
    The burgers here are grade a number 1.
Translations

Etymology 2

Old English ān.

Pronunciation

Article

a (indefinite)

  1. Apocopic form of an. One; any indefinite example of.
    There was a man here looking for you yesterday.
    I've seen it happen a hundred times.
  2. One certain or particular.
    We've received an interesting letter from a Mrs. Miggins of London.
Usage notes
  • The article an is used before vowel sounds, and a before consonant sounds.
Quotations
  • 2005, Emily Kingsley (lyricist), Kevin Clash (voice actor), “A Cookie is a Sometime Food”, Sesame Street, season 36, Sesame Workshop
    Hoots the Owl: Yes a, fruit, is a [sic], any, time, food!
Translations

Etymology 3

Unstressed form of on.

Pronunciation

Preposition

a

  1. (archaic) In, on, at, by.
    A God’s name.
    Torn a pieces.
    Stand a tiptoe.
    • Shakespeare, Hamlet, IV-v: A Sundays
    • Chaucer: Wit that men have now a days.
  2. (archaic) In the process of; in the act of; into; to. (Used with verbal substantives in -ing which begin with a consonant.)
    • King James Bible, Hebrews 11-21: Jacob, when he was a dying
    • Shakespeare: It was a doing.
    • Bob Dylan: The times, they are a changin'.
  3. (archaic) Of.
    The name of John a Gaunt.
    • Shakespeare, 1 Henry IV, I-ii: What time a day is it?
    • Ben Jonson: It’s six a clock.
  4. To, each, per.
    I brush my teeth twice a day.
    The servants are given a bonus of six shillings a man.

Etymology 4

Unstressed variant of have or of.

Pronunciation

Verb

Infinitive
a

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

a (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (archaic or slang) Have. (Now often attached to preceding auxiliary verb.)
    I shoulda stayed at home last night.
Derived terms

Etymology 5

Unstressed variant of ha (he), heo (she), etc.

Pronunciation

Pronoun

a

  1. He; she; it; they.
    • (obsolete) Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, III-ii:
      a’ brushes his hat o’ mornings.
    • (British, Scottish, dialectical) 1874 Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd, Barnes & Noble Classics reprint [reset], 2005, ch 5 p 117; from "Hardy's 1912 Wessex edition":
      "And how Farmer James would cuss, and call thee a fool, wouldn't he, Joseph, when 'a seed his name looking so inside-out-like?" continued Matthew Moon, with feeling. / "Ay -- 'a would," said Joseph meekly.

Etymology 6

Variant spelling of ah.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ə/, /ɑ:/

Interjection

a

  1. A meaningless syllable; ah.
    • Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, IV-iii:
      A merry heart goes all the day
      Your sad tires in a mile-a
    • Avery, I Love to Singa:
      I love to sing-a
      About the moon-a and the June-a and the Spring-a.

Etymology 7

Abbreviations.

Pronunciation

Abbreviation

a

  1. (on bills, etc.) accepted
  2. ante; before.
  3. (linguistics) active
  4. adjective
  5. An are, a unit of area of which 100 comprise a hectare.

See also

External links

  • a at OneLook® Dictionary Search
  • a in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Afar

Determiner

a

  1. this

Ainu

Pronoun

a- (verb prefix, kana ア-)

  1. I, we, someone, my

Aragonese

Etymology

From Latin illa.

Article

a f. sg.

  1. the
    A luenga aragonesa — “The Aragonese language”

Asturian

Preposition

a

  1. to, towards

Derived terms


Bosnian

Conjunction

a

  1. and
  2. but

Catalan

Etymology 1

Noun

a f. (plural as)

  1. The Latin letter A (lowercase a).
Derived terms
  • no saber ni la a

Etymology 2

Preposition

a

  1. in, at; indicating a particular time or place
  2. per

Usage notes

When the preposition a is followed by a masculine definite article, el (sg.) or els (pl.), it is contracted with it to the forms al (sg.) or als (pl.) respectively. If el would be elided to the form l’ becuse it is before a word beginning with a vowel, the elision to a l’ takes precedence over contracting to al.

The same occurs with the salty article es inv., to form as except where es would be elided to s’

Derived terms

Croatian

Conjunction

a

  1. and
  2. but

Czech

Pronunciation

Conjunction

a

  1. and

Danish

Alternative forms

  • à (unofficial but common)

Preposition

a

  1. of, of...each, each containing
  2. at
  3. to, or

Verb

a

  1. Imperative of ae.

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • (letter name): IPA: /a/
  •  Audiohelp, file

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. The first letter of the Dutch alphabet.

Usage notes

In certain Dutch dialects the IPA: /a/ is pronounced more as IPA: /ɔ/, making words like twaalf rhyme with wolf. In written form, twaalf would be twoalf.

See also

  • Next letter: b

Egyptian

Pronunciation

Noun

D36
Z1

D36:Z1 a

  1. arm

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • (letter name): IPA: /a/
  • (phoneme): IPA: /a/

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. The first letter of the Esperanto alphabet.

See also

  • Next letter: b

Noun

a (plural a-oj, accusative singular a-on, accusative plural a-ojn)

  1. The name of the letter A/a.

Filipino

Interjection

a

  1. ah! (an exclamation of pity, admiration or surprise)
    A! Kailan namatay ang iyong ina? — "Ah! When did your mother die?"

Letter

a

  1. the first letter of the Filipino alphabet

French

Letter

a m. (lower case, upper case A)

  1. The 1st letter of the French alphabet, preceding b.

Pronoun

a (plural elles)

  1. (Quebec, informal) Alternative form of elle.

Symbol

a

  1. are (100 square metres)

Verb

a

  1. Third-person singular indicative present of avoir.

See also


Galician

Etymology 1

From Latin ad (to, toward).

Preposition

a

  1. to, toward; indicating direction of motion
  2. introduces indirect object
  3. used to indicate time of an action
  4. (with de) to, until; used to indicate the end of a range
    de cinco a oito — "from five to eight"
  5. by, on, by means of; expresses a mode of action
    aon foot
  6. for; indicates price or cost
Usage notes

The preposition a regularly forms contractions when it precedes the definite article o, a, os, and as. For example, a o ("to the") contracts to ao or ó, and a a ("to the") contracts to á.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin illa, feminine of ille (that).

Article

a f. sg. (masculine singular o, feminine plural as, masculine plural os)

  1. (definite) the
Usage notes

The definite article o (in all its forms) regularly forms contractions when it follows the prepositions a (to), con (with), de (of, from), and en (in). For example, con a ("with the") contracts to coa, and en a ("in the") contracts to na.

Derived terms

Pronoun

a f accusative (nominative ela, oblique ela, dative lle)

  1. her (feminine singular third-person personal pronoun)
Usage notes

The third-person direct object pronouns o, os, a, and as, have variant forms prefixed with l- or n-. These alternative forms appear depending on the ending of the preceding word. The l- forms (e.g. la) are used when the preceding word ends in -r or -s. The n- forms (e.g. na) are used when the preceding word ends in a -u or a diphthong. These alternative forms are then suffixed to the preceding word.

In all other situations, the standard forms of the pronouns are used (o, os, a, as) and are not suffixed to the preceding word.

These direct object pronouns also form contractions when they immediately follow an indirect object pronoun. For example, Dou che a ("I gave you it.") contracts to Dou cha.

Derived terms
  • cha
  • llela
  • lla
Related terms
See also

Haitian Creole

Article

a

  1. the (definite article)

Usage notes

This term only follows words that end with an oral (non-nasal) consonant and an oral vowel in that order, and can only modify singular nouns.

See also


Hungarian

Article

a (definite)

  1. the
    a hölgy - the lady

Usage notes

Used before words starting with a consonant.

Related terms

  • az, for words starting with a vowel

Ido

Alternative forms

  • (before a vowel) ad

Preposition

a

  1. to

Interlingua

Preposition

a

  1. to, at

Derived terms


Irish

Pronunciation

Particle

a

  1. Vocative (triggers lenition)
    A Dhia! — "O God!"
    A dhuine uasail — "Sir"
    Tar isteach, a Sheáin — "Come in, Seán"
    A amadáin! — "You fool!"
  2. Numeral (attaches h to a vowel)
    A haon, a dó, a trí... — "One, two, three..."
    Séamas a — "James the Second"
    Bus a seacht — "The number seven bus"
  3. Direct relative (triggers lenition)
    An fear a chuireann síol — "The man who sows seed"
    An síol a chuireann an fear — "The seed that the man sows"
    Nuair a éirím — "When I rise"
  4. Indirect relative (triggers eclipsis)
    An bord a bhfuil leabhar air — "The table on which there is a book"
    An fear a bhfuil a mac ag imeacht — "The man whose son is going away"
  5. how, used with an abstract noun (triggers lenition)
    A ghéire a labhair sí — "How sharply she spoke"
    A fheabhas atá sé — "How good it is"

Preposition

a

  1. to, used with a verbal noun (triggers lenition)
    Síol a chur — "To sow seed"
    Uisce a ól — "To drink water"
    An rud atá sé a scríobh — "What he is writing"
    D’éirigh sé a chaint — "He rose to speak"
    Téigh a chodladh — "Go to sleep"

Pronoun

a

  1. his, its (triggers lenition)
    A athair agus a mháthair — "His father and mother"
    Chaill an t-éan a chleití — "The bird lost its feathers"
  2. her, its (attaches h to a vowel)
    A hathair agus a máthair — "Her father and mother"
    Bhris an mheaig a heiteog — "The magpie broke its wing"
  3. their (triggers eclipsis)
    a dtithe — "their houses"
    a n-ainmneacha — "their names"
  4. all that, whatever
    Sin a bhfuil ann — "That's all that is there"
    An bhfuair tú a raibh uait? — "Did you get all that you wanted?"
    Íocfaidh mé as a gceannóidh tú — "I will pay for whatever you buy"

Italian

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Latin ad. In a few phrases, a stems from Latin a, ab.[1]

Preposition

a

  1. in
  2. at
  3. to
  4. Indicates the direct object, mainly to avoid confusion when it, the subject, or both are displaced, or for emphasis
    A me non importa. — “It doesn’t matter to me.” (literally, "To me it doesn’t matter.")
    A lei non piace, ma a lui piace molto — “She doesn't like it, but he likes it very much.”
Usage notes

When followed by a definite article, a is combined with the article to give the following combined forms:

Etymology 2

Verb

a

  1. Common misspelling of ha.

References

  • Notes:
  1. ^ Angelo Prati, "Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano", Torino, 1951

Japanese

Noun

a (hiragana )

  1. : hiragana letter a
  2. : katakana letter a

Krisa

Noun

a m.

  1. pig

Latin

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. (sometimes with littera) the first letter of the Latin alphabet.
    littera a — “the letter a”

Usage notes

Preposition

a (takes object in ablative case)

  1. of; from

Synonyms

Derived terms

Interjection

ā!

  1. ah

Lingua Franca Nova

Preposition

a

  1. to, at, in, on, toward, towards, in the manner of

Interjection

a

  1. ah

Noun

a

  1. “the letter a”

Mandarin

Particle

a (Pinyin a, traditional and simplified )

Modal particle (used as phrase suffix)

  1. (in enumeration)
    qian a, shu a, biao a, wo dou diu le. Money, books, watch, I lost everything.
  2. (in direct address and exclamation)
    Lao Wang a, zhe ke bùxíng a! Old Wang, this won't do!
  3. (indicating obviousness/impatience)
    lai a! Come on!
  4. (for confirmation)
    ni bu lai a? So, you're not coming?

Pronunciation

Interjection

a (Pinyin ā or a, traditional and simplified )

  1. (Beginning Mandarin) ah; oh

Usage notes

  • placed at the end of a sentence, or used by itself to express surprise.

Pinyin

a (form of a0 or a5)

  1. : exclamatory particle
  2. :

Pinyin syllable

a

  1. A transliteration of any of a number of Chinese characters properly represented as having one of four tones, ā, á, ǎ, or à.

Usage notes

English transcriptions of Chinese speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Chinese language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

References

  • Shao, Jingmin (ed.) (2000). HSK Dictionary (HSK汉语水平考试词典) (in Mandarin/English). Shanghai: Huadong Teachers College Publishers. ISBN 7561720785.

Min Nan

simpl. and trad.

Pronunciation

Interjection

a (POJ, traditional and simplified )

  1. ah; oh

Usage notes

  • placed at the end of a sentence, or used by itself to express surprise.

Navajo

Letter

A a

  1. The first letter of the Navajo alphabet:
    a = /a˨/
    ą = /ã˨/
    á = /a˥/
    ą́ = /ã˥/
    aa = /aː˨˨/
    ąą = /ãː˨˨/
    áa = /aː˥˨/
    ą́ą = /ãː˥˨/
    aá = /aː˨˥/
    ąą́ = /ãː˨˥/
    áá = /aː˥˥/
    ą́ą́ = /ãː˥˥/

Novial

Preposition

a

  1. to

Usage notes

When followed by the definite article, li, a may optionally be combined with the article to give al.


Old English

Etymology

Germanic *aiwi-, from Proto-Indo-European *aiw- (vitality). Cognate with Old Saxon eo, Old High German io, eo (German je), Old Norse ei, ey (English aye), Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐍅𐍃 (age, eternity).

Pronunciation

Adverb

ā

  1. ever, always

Descendants


Old French

Etymology

Latin ad

Preposition

a

  1. to
  2. towards
  3. belonging to
    fil a putain - son of a whore

Derived terms

Descendants

  • French: à

Etymology 2

From the verb avoir, aveir

Verb form

a

  1. Third-person singular present indicative of avoir.

Polish

Pronunciation

Conjunction

a

  1. and; but
    A ty? - “And you?”
    Ty wolisz tabletki, a ja wolę zastrzyki. - “You prefer pills and I prefer injections.”

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: a

Etymology 1

From Latin illa

Article

a f.

  1. Feminine singular of article o.
    Lá vem a chuva. — “Here comes the rain.”

See also

Portuguese articles (edit)
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine Masculine Feminine
Definite articles
(the)
o a os as
Indefinite articles
(a, an; some)
um uma uns umas

Etymology 2

From Latin ad (to)

Preposition

a

  1. to
    Vamos a Paris! — “Let’s go to Paris!”
    a você — “to you” (***)
    a onze milhas — “eleven miles away” (*.*)
    a vinte metros — “twenty meters away” (*.*)
    a mim — “to me” (***)
    a ti — “to you” (***)
    a ele — “to him” (***)
    a ela — “to her” (***)
    a nós — “to us” (***)
    a vós — “to you” (***)
    a eles — “to them” (***)
    a elas — “to them” (***)
    à distância — “at a distance” (*.*)
    a cavalo — “on horseback” (*.*)
    a convite de — “at the invitation of” (***)
    uma viagem a Paris — “a trip to Paris” (*.*)
    fazer uma visita a um lugar (ou pessoa) — “to pay a visit to some place (or person)” (***)
    Meu coração pertence a você. = “My heart belongs to you.”
  2. at
    Onde vai ele a esta hora da noite? — “Where is he going at this time of night?”
  3. Indicates the direct object, mainly to avoid confusion when it, the subject, or both are displaced.
    A mim ele não engana. — “He doesn’t deceive me.” (literally, “To me he doesn’t deceive.”)
Usage notes

When followed by a definite article, a is combined with the article to give the following combined forms:

Synonyms
See also

Pronoun

a f. (third person singular)

  1. Her, it (as a direct object; as an indirect object, see lhe; after prepositions, see ela).
    Encontrei-a na rua. — “I met her/it on the street.”

Usage notes

  • Becomes -la after verb forms ending in -r, -s, or -z, the pronouns nos and vos, and the adverb eis; the final letter causing the change disappears.
    After ver: Posso vê-la? — “May I see her/it?”
    After pôs: Quero pô-la ali. — “I want to put her/it there.”
    After fiz: Fi-la ficar contente. — “I made her/it happy.”
    After nos: Deu-no-la relutantemente. — “He gave her/it to us reluctantly.”
    After eis: Ei-la! — “Behold her/it!”
  • Becomes -na after a nasal diphthong: -ão, -am [ɐ̃w̃], -õe [õj], -em, -êm [ẽj].
    Detêm-na como prisioneira. — “They detain her/it as a prisoner.”
  • In Brazil it is being abandoned in favor of the nominative form ela.
    Eu a vi.Eu vi ela. = “I saw her/it.”
See also
Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Subject
(nominative case)
Direct object
(accusative case)
Indirect object
(dative case)
com +
indirect object
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo
Third ele, ela lhe, o, a, se ele, ela, si consigo
Plural First nós nos nós conosco
Second vós vos vós convosco
Third eles, elas lhes, os, as, se eles, elas, si consigo

Etymology 3

From homophone

Verb

a

  1. Common misspelling of .

Etymology 4

From homophone à

Contraction

a

  1. Common misspelling of à.

Romanian

Pronunciation

Letter

a (lowercase, capital A)

  1. The first letter of the Romanian alphabet

Usage notes

In Romanian, the letter a represents the phoneme /a/.

See also

  • Next letter: ă

Article

a (feminine singular possessive article)

  1. of
    sora a lui Alexandru
    Alexandru's sister
    cartea a mea
    my book

See also

  • al (masculine/neuter singular)
  • ai (masculine plural)
  • ale (feminine/neuter plural)

Preposition

a

  1. (used with infinitive verbs) the infinitive marker to
    A fi.
    To be.

Verb

(el/ea) a (modal auxiliary; third-person singular form of avea, used with past participles to form perfect compus tenses)

  1. (modal auxiliary)
    A văzut acest film?
    Has he/she seen this film?

Usage notes

a is used instead of are to form the third-person singular perfect compus.


Scots

Determiner

a

  1. Alternative spelling of aw.

Noun

a (uncountable)

Singular
a

Plural
uncountable

  1. Alternative spelling of aw.

Scottish Gaelic

Pronoun

a

  1. his
  2. her
  3. its
  4. who, which, that

Usage notes

  • As his/its lenites the following word.
    a mhac - his son
    a mac - her son
  • As his/its is omitted if the following word begins with a vowel or fh followed by a vowel.
    athair - a father or his father (depending on the context)

Preposition

a

  1. Alternative form of do.

Particle

a

  1. to (precedes the infinitive form)
    Tha mi a' dol a chadal. - I'm going to sleep.
  2. Used before cardinal numbers which are not followed by a noun.
    A bheil agad a ceithir? - Do you have four?
  3. Used before the vocative form.
    Hallo, a Ruairidh. - Hello, Roderick.

Serbian

Pronunciation

  • (phoneme) IPA: /a/

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. The first letter of the Serbian Latin alphabet.

Usage notes

The Serbian name for а (a) is а (ā), and in stressed syllables it has the sound of the long a in father. In unstressed positions, it has the sound of the u in but.

See also

  • Next letter: b

Conjunction

a (Cyrillic spelling а)

  1. and
  2. but

Slovak

Conjunction

a

  1. and

Slovene

Pronunciation

Letter

a (lowercase, capital A)

  1. The first letter of the Slovene alphabet, followed by b.

Conjunction

a

  1. but

Spanish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. First letter of the Spanish alphabet.

Noun

a f. (plural as)

Singular
a f.

Plural
as f.

  1. Name of the letter A.

Etymology 2

Latin ad (to)

Alternative spellings

  • (obsolete) á

Preposition

a

  1. to
  2. by
  3. at
  4. Used before words referring to people, pets, or personified objects or places that function as direct objects. personal a
    Lo busca a Usted. — “He is looking for you.”
Usage notes
  • (before words referring to people or personified objects): Personal a is not translated in English.

See also


Sranan Tongo

Noun

a

  1. it

Tagalog

Interjection

a

  1. ah! (an exclamation of pity, admiration or surprise)
    A! Kailan namatay ang iyong ina? — "Ah! When did your mother die?"

Letter

a

  1. the first letter of the Tagalog alphabet

Welsh

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • (letter name): IPA: /aː/
  • (phoneme): IPA: /a/, /aː/

Letter

a (lower case, upper case A)

  1. â, the first letter of the Welsh alphabet

Derived terms

See also

  • Next letter: b

Yiddish

Pronunciation

Article

a

  1. a, an

Related terms

  • an form used before a vowel

Yoruba

Pronoun

a

  1. First-person plural subject pronoun, we:
    a lo — “we went”

Simple English

This page is about the first letter in the alphabet.
For the indefinite article, see Article (grammar).
For other uses of A, see A (disambiguation)
The Latin alphabet
Aa Bb Cc Dd
Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj
Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp
Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv
Ww Xx Yy Zz

A is the first letter of the English alphabet. a is a usual symbol for a low central vowel, as in "father"; the English long a (ā) is pronounced as a diphthong of ĕ and y. The corresponding letter of the Greek alphabet is named alpha. Alpha and omega, the last letter of the Greek alphabet, symbolize the beginning and the end. In musical notation the letter A is the symbol of a note in the scale, below B and above G.

  • A is the letter that was formerly used to represent a team in an old TV show, The A Team.
Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:








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