absolute: Wikis


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Absolute may refer to:

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  • Absolute Radio, the UK radio station formerly known as Virgin Radio.

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also Absolute

Contents

English

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Etymology

Latin absolutus (unconditional), past participle of absolvere (to loosen, to free, to complete). Compare French absolu. See absolve.

Pronunciation

Adjective

absolute (comparative more absolute or (rarely) absoluter, superlative most absolute or (rarely) absolutest)

Positive
absolute

Comparative
more absolute or (rarely) absoluter

Superlative
most absolute or (rarely) absolutest

  1. Loosed from any limitation or condition; uncontrolled; unrestricted; unconditional; as, absolute authority, monarchy, sovereignty, an absolute promise or command.
    • 1962, Hannah Arendt, On Revolution, (1990), page 155
      [T]he more absolute the ruler, the more absolute the revolution will be which replaces him.
  2. Complete in itself; perfect; consummate; faultless.
    absolute perfection
    absolute beauty
    • So absolute she seems, And in herself complete. —John Milton
  3. Viewed apart from modifying influences or without comparison with other objects; actual; real; — opposed to relative and comparative; as, absolute motion; absolute time or space.
    Absolute rights and duties are such as pertain to man in a state of nature as contradistinguished from relative rights and duties, or such as pertain to him in his social relations.
  4. Loosed from, or unconnected by, dependence on any other being; self-existent; self-sufficing.
    Note: In this sense God is called the Absolute by the theist. The term is also applied by the pantheist to the universe, or the total of all existence, as only capable of relations in its parts to each other and to the whole, and as dependent for its existence and its phenomena on its mutually depending forces and their laws.
  5. Capable of being thought or conceived by itself alone; unconditioned; non-relative.
    Note: It is in dispute among philosophers whether the term, in this sense, is not applied to a mere logical fiction or abstraction, or whether the absolute, as thus defined, can be known, as a reality, by the human intellect.
    • To Cusa we can indeed articulately trace, word and thing, the recent philosophy of the absolute. —William Hamilton
  6. (rare) Positive; clear; certain; not doubtful.
    • I am absolute ’t was very Cloten. —Shakespeare, Cymbeline, IV,ii
  7. (rare) Authoritative; peremptory.
  8. (chemistry) Pure; unmixed; as, absolute alcohol.
  9. (grammar) Not immediately dependent on the other parts of the sentence in government; as, the case absolute. (See ablative absolute.)

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

Singular
absolute

Plural
absolutes

absolute (plural absolutes)

  1. That which is independent of context-dependent interpretation, inviolate, fundamental.
    • moral absolutes
  2. (geometry) In a plane, the two imaginary circular points at infinity; in space of three dimensions, the imaginary circle at infinity.

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References

  • absolute in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams


Dutch

Adjective

absolute

  1. Inflected form of absoluut.

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /apsoˈlute/

Adverb

absolute

  1. absolutely

Latin

Etymology

From absolūtus (complete, finished)

Adverb

absolūtē (comparative absolūtius, superlative absolūtissimē)

  1. absolutely, completely, fully

Related terms

  • absolūtus

References

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)







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