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And or AND may be any of the following:


And or AND may be any of the following:,


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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See also AND, and ånd

Contents

English

Most common English words: the « of « #3: and » to » in » I

Etymology

Old English and, ond, from Proto-Germanic *unda, probably from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énti (facing opposite, near, in front of, before). Cognate with West Frisian en, Dutch en, German und, Danish end (but).

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) enPR: ănd IPA: /ænd/, SAMPA: /{nd/
  •  Audio (US)help, file
  • (unstressed) enPR: ən(d) IPA: /ən(d)/, /n̩/, SAMPA: /@n(d)/, /n=/
  •  Audio (US)help, file The unstressed and as part of the phrase “ham and eggs”.
    Rhymes: -ænd

Conjunction

and

  1. Used to connect two homogeneous (similar) words or phrases.
    Boys and girls come out to play.
  2. Used at the end of a list to indicate the last item.
    bread, butter and cheese
  3. Used to join sentences or sentence fragments in chronological order.
    I mended the chair and it broke again.
  4. Used to indicate causation.
    Ask me the definition of “and” again and I’ll scream.
  5. (informal) To; used to connect two finite verbs.
    Try and do better.
    Be sure and read it twice.
    Call and see whether John is coming over.
  6. (mathematics) Used to indicate addition.
    Five and six are eleven.
  7. (now US dialectal) If.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VII:
      "Where ys Sir Launcelot?" seyde King Arthure. "And he were here, he wolde nat grucche to do batayle for you."

Quotations

Usage notes

Synonyms

  • (used to connect two similar words or phrases): as well as, together with, in addition to

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Anagrams


Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse ǫnd, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enh₁-ti- (duck).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /and/, [anˀ]

Noun

and c. (singular definite anden, plural indefinite ænder)

  1. duck
  2. canard (false or misleading report or story)

Inflection


Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *amta. Cognates include Finnish antaa and Hungarian ad.

Noun

and

  1. gift

Norwegian

Pronunciation

 audiohelp, file

Noun

and m. and f. (definite singular anda/anden; indefinite plural ender; definite plural endene)

  1. duck

Old English

Etymology

Proto-Germanic *unda, probably from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énti (facing opposite, near, in front of, before).

Pronunciation

Conjunction

and

  1. and

Adverb

and

  1. even; also

Old Frisian

Conjunction

and

  1. and

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse ǫnd, from Old High German anat, from Latin anas.

Pronunciation

Noun

Inflection for and Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form and anden änder änderna
Possessive form ands andens änders ändernas

and c.

  1. a wild duck

See also

  • anka (domesticated duck)

Simple English

Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:

And or AND may be any of the following:

  • Grammatical conjunction, a part of speech that connects two words, phrases, or clauses together
  • Logical conjunction, a two-place logical operation used in logic and mathematics
  • Binary and, a bitwise operator used in computer programming
  • AND gate, a digital logic gate used in electronics
  • The 3-letter and NATO country code for Andorra
  • The standard abbreviation for the constellation Andromeda
  • The National Rail code for Anderston railway station, Scotland







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