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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also Bank, and bänk

Contents

English

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Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Middle English from Middle French banque, from Italian banca (counter, moneychanger's table), of Germanic origin, from Old High German bank, banch, banc (counter, bench), from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench, counter)

Noun

Singular
bank

Plural
banks

bank (plural banks)

  1. An institution where one can place and borrow money and take care of financial affairs.
  2. A branch office of such an institution
  3. An underwriter or controller of a card game, also banque.
  4. A safe and guaranteed place of storage for and retrieval of important items or goods.
    blood bank
    sperm bank
    data bank
  5. An edge of a river or lake
  6. A slope of earth etc.; an embankment
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to bank

Third person singular
banks

Simple past
banked

Past participle
banked

Present participle
banking

to bank (third-person singular simple present banks, present participle banking, simple past and past participle banked)

  1. (intransitive) To deal with a bank or financial institution.
    He banked with Barclays.
  2. (transitive) To put into a bank.
    I'm going to bank the money.
Translations
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Middle English banke, from Old English hōbanca (couch) and Old English bank, hillock, embankment from Proto-Germanic *bankōn-. Akin to Old Norse elevation, hill

Noun

Singular
bank

Plural
banks

bank (plural banks)

  1. An edge of river or other watercourse.
  2. (nautical) An elevation, or rising ground, under the sea; a shallow area of shifting sand, gravel, mud, and so forth (for example, a sandbank or mudbank).
  3. An embankment
  4. (aviation) The incline of an aircraft, especially during a turn.
  5. (rail transport) an incline, a hill
Translations
Derived terms

Verb

Infinitive
to bank

Third person singular
banks

Simple past
banked

Past participle
banked

Present participle
banking

to bank (third-person singular simple present banks, present participle banking, simple past and past participle banked)

  1. (intransitive, aviation) To roll or incline laterally in order to turn.
  2. (transitive) To cause (an aircraft) to bank.
  3. (transitive) To form into a bank or heap, to bank up.
  4. (transitive) To cover the embers of a fire with ashes in order to retain heat.
Translations

Etymology 3

Middle English bank (bank), banke, from Old French banc (bench), of Germanic origin, from Frankish *bank. Akin to Old English benc (bench)

Noun

Singular
bank

Plural
banks

bank (plural banks)

  1. A row or panel of items stored or grouped together.
    a bank of switches
  2. A row of keys on a musical keyboard or the equivalent on a typewriter keyboard.
Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to bank

Third person singular
banks

Simple past
banked

Past participle
banked

Present participle
banking

to bank (third-person singular simple present banks, present participle banking, simple past and past participle banked)

  1. (transitive, order and arrangement) To arrange or order in a row.

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of abkn
  • nabk

Crimean Tatar

Noun

bank

  1. bank (financial institution)

Declension


Danish

Etymology 1

From French banque, from Italian banco (bench).

Noun

bank c. (singular definite banken, plural indefinite banker)

  1. bank (financial institution, branch office, controller of a game, a safe and guaranteed place of storage)
Derived terms
Inflection

Etymology 2

From German Bank (bench).

Noun

bank c.

  1. only used in certain expressions
Derived terms
  • over en bank

Noun

bank n. (singular definite banket, plural indefinite bank)

  1. knock (an abrupt rapping sound)
  2. (pl.) a beating
Synonyms
  • (beating): tæsk, tæv
Inflection

Verb

bank

  1. Imperative of banke.

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

bank m. and f. (plural banken, diminutive bankje, diminutive plural bankjes)

  1. bank (financial institution)
  2. couch, sofa, bench

Derived terms

  • door de bank genomen
  • spermabank

Hungarian

Pronunciation

Noun

bank (plural bankok)

  1. bank (financial institution)

Declension

Derived terms


Maltese

Noun

bank (plural banek (bank), bankijiet (bench))

  1. bank
  2. bench

Middle English

Noun

bank

  1. the bank of a river or lake

Norwegian

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /bɑŋk/

Noun

bank m. (definite singular banken; indefinite plural banker; definite plural bankene)

  1. bank

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA: [bãŋk]

Noun

bank m. (plural banki)

  1. bank

Declension

Singular Plural
Nominative bank banki
Genitive banku banków
Dative bankowi bankom
Accusative bank banki
Instrumental bankiem bankami
Locative banku bankach
Vocative banku banki

Derived terms


Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

Inflection for bank Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form bank banken banker bankerna
Possessive form banks bankens bankers bankernas

bank c.

  1. bank (financial institution, branch of such an institution)
  2. bank (place of storage)
  3. bank (of a river of lake)
  4. sandbank

Derived terms

  • blodbank
  • spermabank
  • strandbank

Volapük

Noun

bank

  1. bank (financial institution)

Simple English

A bank is a place where money can be saved or loaned out from. Someone's money can be placed in the bank for safe keeping. Or the bank can give out loans to people for an agreement to pay the bank back at a later time, usually with interest. The people who run a bank are called bankers.

Banks also can use the money they have from deposits to invest in businesses in order to make more money.

In most of the modern world a bank settled by the government but independent of the state administrators controls how much money appears at a time. Such a kind of bank is called a national bank. A national bank ordinarily issues bills and/or coins. In some countries issuing money is the task of the government.

The word bank comes from an Italian word banco, meaning a bench, since Italian merchants in the medieval talked on borrowing and lending money between each others beside a bank and money was placed on that bank.

Traces of the Phoenician civilization showed a form of currency exchange among troc exchanges; it is believed that merchants from Alexandria deposited their "valuables" in Phoenicia.



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