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Confidence is generally described as a state of being certain either that a hypothesis or prediction is correct or that a chosen course of action is the best or most effective. Self-confidence is having confidence in oneself. Arrogance or hubris in this comparison, is having unmerited confidence--believing something or someone is capable or correct when they are not. Overconfidence or presumptuousness is excessive belief, in someone or something, succeeding, without any regard for failure. Scientifically, a situation can only be judged after the aim has been achieved or not. Confidence can be a self-fulfilling prophecy as those without it may fail or not try because they lack it and those with it may succeed because they have it rather than because of an innate ability.

Self-Confidence

Self-confidence does not necessarily imply 'self-belief' or a belief in one's ability to succeed. For instance, one may be inept at a particular sport or activity, but remain 'confident' in their demeanour, simply because they do not place a great deal of emphasis on the outcome of the activity. The key element to self-confidence is, therefore, an acceptance of the myriad consequences of a particular situation, be they good or bad. When one does not dwell on negative consequences one can be more 'self-confident' because one is worrying far less about failure or (more accurately) the disapproval of others following potential failure. One is then more likely to focus on the actual situation which means that enjoyment and success in that situation is also more probable. If there is any 'self-belief' component it is simply a belief in one's ability to tolerate whatever outcome may arise; a certainty that one will cope irrespective of what happens. Belief in one's abilities to perform an activity comes through successful experience and may add to, or consolidate, a general sense of self-confidence.

When an individual has a generally nonchalant attitude toward life they can also appear very self-confident when this is not necessarily the case. Instead it is likely that the individual has a poor coping style and does not realistically evaluate situational consequences; and usually the feelings of others. For this reason they may also appear arrogant because they may demonstrate an air of superiority and a lack of concern towards the welfare of others as they evaluate consequences and the feelings of others to be insignificant rather than acceptable. The more marked this attitude is the greater is the likelihood of psychopathology.

Confidence in others

People may have confidence in other people or forces beyond their control. For instance, one might have confidence in the police to protect them, or may have confidence that a sports team will win a game. Faith and Trust are synonyms of confidence when used in this sense.

See also


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

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Etymology

Latin confidentia > confidere > con- + fidere > fides

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
confidence

Plural
uncountable

confidence (uncountable)

  1. Self-assurance.
  2. Expression or feeling of certainty.
  3. The quality of trusting.
  4. Information held in secret.

Quotations

  • 1956Arthur C. Clarke, The City and the Stars, p 39
    Khedron hesitated for a moment, wondering how far he should take Jeserac into his confidence. He knew that Jeserac was kindly and well-intentioned, but he also knew that he must be bound by the same taboos that controlled everyone on Diaspar.

Antonyms

  • (self-assurance): fear

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.







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