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EME can refer to: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c8/ In organizations:

In science and technology:

In other:


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also -eme, and -ème

Contents

English

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Etymology

Middle English eam, eme (uncle) from Old English ēam from Proto-Germanic *awun-haimaz (maternal uncle) from Proto-Germanic *awōn-, awēn- (grandmother, father, uncle) from Proto-Indo-European *awo- (grandfather, adult male other than one's father). Akin to Old Frisian ēm (uncle), Middle Dutch oom (Modern Dutch oom (uncle)), Old High German ōheim (German Oheim, Ohm (uncle)), Latin avus (grandfather).

Noun

Singular
eme

Plural
emes

eme (plural emes)

  1. (obsolete) An uncle.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VIII:
      So aftir this yonge Trystrames rode unto his eme, Kynge Marke of Cornwayle, and whan he com there he herde sey that there wolde no knyght fyght with Sir Marhalt.
  2. (Scottish) An uncle.
  3. (Scottish) friend.

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of eem
  • mee

Basque

Noun

eme

  1. female

Hungarian

Determiner

eme (demonstrative)

  1. (archaic, poetic) this
    • 1846: Petőfi Sándor, Egy gondolat bánt engemet...
      És a zászlókon eme szent jelszóval: - (And on the flags with this holy word:)
      „Világszabadság!” - (World freedom!)

Synonyms

Usage notes

A rarer substitute of ez, but unlike ez, it does not take the case of the noun it is attached to, and no definite article is used:

ezen a helyen - eme helyen (at this place)
ebben a házban - eme házban (in this house)

Italian

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Eme

Wikipedia it

Noun

eme m. (plural emi)

  1. (biochemistry) heme

Scots

Etymology

Middle English eem from Old English ēam, from Proto-Germanic *auhaimoz (maternal uncle), probably ultimately related to Latin avus (grandfather). Cognate with Dutch oom, German Ohm, Oheim.

Noun

eme (plural emes)

Singular
eme

Plural
emes

  1. uncle
  2. friend

Spanish

Noun

eme f. (plural emes)

Singular
eme f.

Plural
emes f.

  1. Name of the letter m.

Tacana

Noun

eme

  1. hand

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