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A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary.

Contents

In the Commonwealth Realms

In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth Realms, a Golden Jubilee celebration is held in the 50th year of a monarch's reign.

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For Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II celebrated her Golden Jubilee in 2002, having acceded to the throne in 1952.

For Queen Victoria

In 1887, the United Kingdom and the British Empire celebrated Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. Victoria marked 20 June 1887—the fiftieth anniversary of her accession—with a banquet, to which fifty European kings and princes were invited. Although she could not have been aware of it, there was a plan by Irish Republicans to blow up Westminster Abbey while the Queen attended a service of thanksgiving. This assassination attempt, when it was discovered, became known as the Jubilee Plot. At the time, Victoria was an extremely popular monarch: the next day, she participated in a procession that, in the words of Mark Twain, "stretched to the limit of sight in both directions".

Of other monarchs of Great Britain

Although the notion of a Jubilee celebration seems to be an innovation dating from Victoria's reign, prior to this there were four monarchs of the British Isles who reigned more than 50 years. They are:

  • George III (1760-1820, Jubilee in 1810) 59 years, 3 months, 2 days. King George was quite ill at the time of his Jubilee and would go permanently insane the year after.
  • Henry III (1216-1272, Jubilee in 1266) 56 years, 29 days
  • Edward III (1327-1377, Jubilee in 1377) 50 years, 4 months, 25 days
  • James VI of Scotland (1567-1625, Jubilee in 1617) 57 years, 7 months, 3 days

In Japan

In Japan, Golden Jubilee refers to 50th and called as Go-Zai-i 50nen kinen(御在位50年記念). Emperor Hirohito (or Emperor Shōwa), celebrated his Golden Jubilee on 10 November 1976. Showa Memorial Park was established as part of a project to commemorate his Golden Jubilee .

In China

In other countries

  • In Thailand, King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the world's longest-reigning monarch, celebrated his Golden Jubilee on 9 June 1996.
  • In Malaysia, Sultan Tuanku Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah celebrated his Golden Jubilee on 15 July 2008 after 50 years successfully reigning the state of Kedah[1].
  • In Egypt, The Egyptian Television celebrated its Golden Jubilee on 22 July 2010 after 50 years from airing for the first time.
  • In Kenya, The Nation Media Group's Daily Nation and Sunday Nation celebrated their Golden Jubilee in the year 2010 after 50 years from being published for the first time. (Sunday Nation - March 1960; Daily Nation - October 1960)

In South Asian film terminology

In Pakistan and India, a golden jubilee film is one shown in cinemas for 50 weeks or more. The success measure for a 'superhit golden jubilee film' is a minimum of four months on its main cinema.[citation needed]

See also

References

  1. ^ Kedah Sultan's Golden Jubilee Celebration Bernama.com, 12 July 2008


A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary.

Contents

In the Commonwealth Realms

In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth Realms, a Golden Jubilee celebration is held in the 50th year of a monarch's reign.

For Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II celebrated her Golden Jubilee in 2002, having acceded to the throne in 1952. It was marked by a tour of the United Kingdom and her other realms, beginning with Jamaica and moving on to New Zealand, Australia, and Canada.

The highlight of the year was a massive celebration in London during the first week of June, which included two large concerts taking place on the back lawn of Buckingham Palace, and televised by the BBC. The classical concert, Prom at the Palace, starred, among others, Kiri te Kanawa, Angela Gheorghiu and Roberto Alagna with the BBC Symphony Orchestra and BBC Symphony Chorus conducted by Sir Andrew Davis. Michael Parkinson, famed UK talkshow veteran, was the Master of Ceremonies. It concluded with a rendition of Land of Hope and Glory, sung by the hundreds on the lawn and the thousands outside the palace gates, and in the parks watching the concert on big screens.

The same double audience - inside and outside the palace - attended and/or viewed the pop concert, Party at the Palace, which was also televised. It began with a rendition of God Save the Queen played by Brian May of Queen from the roof of the palace. In the onstage orchestra, Phil Collins played drums for the whole event. Taking a broad view of pop music, the stars included Queen, Tony Bennett, Brian Wilson, Sir Paul McCartney, Rod Stewart and Joe Cocker.

This was the first time that the Queen had opened Buckingham Palace Gardens to the public for concerts. The Royal Family sat in a large royal box and all appeared to enjoy the proceedings.

The week of celebration culminated in a national service of thanksgiving at St. Paul's Cathedral, and a procession down The Mall.

To mark the jubilee year, five towns in the UK were awarded city status by Her Majesty.

For Queen Victoria

In 1887, the United Kingdom and the British Empire celebrated Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. Victoria marked 20 June 1887—the fiftieth anniversary of her accession—with a banquet, to which fifty European kings and princes were invited. Although she could not have been aware of it, there was a plan by Irish Republicans to blow up Westminster Abbey while the Queen attended a service of thanksgiving. This assassination attempt, when it was discovered, became known as The Jubilee Plot. At the time, Victoria was an extremely popular monarch: The next day, she participated in a procession that, in the words of Mark Twain, "stretched to the limit of sight in both directions".

Of other monarchs of Great Britain

Although the notion of a Jubilee celebration seems to be an innovation dating from Victoria's reign, prior to this there were four monarchs of the British Isles who reigned more than 50 years. They are:

  • George III (1760-1820, Jubilee in 1810) 59 years, 3 months, 2 days
  • Henry III (1216-1272, Jubilee in 1266) 56 years, 29 days
  • Edward III (1327-1377, Jubilee in 1377) 50 years, 4 months, 25 days
  • James VI of Scotland (1567-1625, Jubilee in 1617) 57 years, 7 months, 3 days

In Japan

In Japan, Golden Jubilee refers to 50th and called as Go-Zai-i 50nen kinen(御在位50年記念). Emperor Hirohito(Or Emperor Shōwa), celebrated his Golden Jubilee on 10 November 1976. Showa Memorial Park was established as park of a project to commemorate his Golden Jubilee .

In other countries

In South Asian film terminology

In Pakistan and India, a golden jubilee film is one shown in cinemas for 50 weeks or more. The success measure for a 'superhit golden jubilee film' is a minimum of four months on its main cinema.[citation needed]

See also

References


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