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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Etymology

C.1530, via French, from Late Latin immanēns, present participle of Latin immanēre, from im- (in) + manēre (to dwell, remain, stay). Cognate with remain and manor.

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Pronunciation

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Particularly: "UK"
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Particularly: "US"

Adjective

immanent (comparative more immanent, superlative most immanent)

Positive
immanent

Comparative
more immanent

Superlative
most immanent

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Wikipedia

  1. Naturally part of something; existing throughout and within something; inherent; integral; intrinsic; indwelling.
  2. Restricted entirely to the mind or a given domain; internal; subjective.
  3. (philosophy, metaphysics, theology) (of Deity) existing within and throughout the mind and the world; dwelling within and throughout all things, all time, etc. Compare transcendent.
  4. (philosophy, of a mental act) Taking place entirely within the mind of the subject and having no effect outside of it. Compare emanant, transeunt.

Related terms

Usage notes

  • Not to be confused with imminent (about to occur) or immanant (a certain type of scalar property of a matrix).

French

Adjective

immanent

  1. immanent

German

Adjective

immanent

  1. immanent

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