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The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the political leader of the United Kingdom and the Head of Her Majesty's Government. The office holder is responsible for selecting all other members of the government, chairing Cabinet meetings and deciding when to call a new general election for the House of Commons.[1][2] The Prime Minister can also make appointments to senior positions in the Church of England, appoint judges and propose the creation of new life peers.[3]

There is no specific date when the office of Prime Minister first appeared, as the role was not created but evolved over a period of time.[4] However, modern historians generally apply the title of First Prime Minister to Sir Robert Walpole, who led the country for 21 years from 1721 to 1742.[5][6] As of 2009, Walpole is the longest serving Prime Minister of the country.[7] The office is held by Gordon Brown, the current Leader of the Labour Party.[8] Template:TOCleft

Colour key
(for political parties)

     Whig      Tory      Conservative      Peelite/Whig      Liberal      Labour      National Labour

Prime Ministers under George I (1714–1727) and George II (1727–1760)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Sir Robert Walpole 4 April 1721
11 Feb. 1742
1722, 1727, 1734, 1741 Whig First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[9][7]
Regarded as the first Prime Minister in the modern sense; The South Sea Company bubble; criticised for Great Britain's poor performance in the War of Jenkins' Ear.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Spencer Compton
The Earl of Wilmington
16 Feb. 1742
2 July 1743
Whig First Lord of the Treasury [10]
Increased tax on spirits; in poor health for much of his time as Prime Minister, the government was led de facto by John Carteret.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Henry Pelham 27 Aug. 1743
6 March 1754
1747 Whig First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[11]
Reorganisation of the Royal Navy; 1745 Jacobite Rebellion; adoption of the Gregorian Calendar; Marriage Act 1753; helped end the War of the Austrian Succession.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Thomas Pelham-Holles
The Duke of Newcastle

(1st ministry)
16 March 1754
16 Nov. 1756
1754 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Led Great Britain into the Seven Years' War with France in North America.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Cavendish
The Duke of Devonshire
16 Nov. 1756
25 June 1757
Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
The government was largely run by William Pitt the Elder.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Thomas Pelham-Holles
The Duke of Newcastle
(2nd ministry)
2 July 1757
26 May 1762
1761 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Great Britain gained more influence abroad in the Seven Years' War; the war was largely prosecuted by Pitt the Elder as Secretary of State.

Prime Ministers under George III (1760–1820)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | John Stuart
The Earl of Bute
26 May 1762
8 April 1763
Tory First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[12]
Ended the dominance of the Whigs and the Seven Years' War.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | George Grenville 16 April 1763
13 July 1765
Whig First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[13]
Lowered domestic tax at the expense of the colonies; introduced the Stamp Act 1765 (which ultimately led to the American Revolution).
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Charles Watson-Wentworth
The Marquess of Rockingham

(1st ministry)
13 July 1765
30 July 1766
Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[14]
Repealed the controversial Stamp Act, inspired by protests from both American colonists and British manufacturers who were hurt by it.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Pitt the Elder
The Earl of Chatham
30 July 1766
14 Oct. 1768
Whig Lord Privy Seal [15]
The first real Imperialist; credited with the birth of the British Empire; indirectly responsible for the French Revolution (due to Great Britain's defeat of France in Canada).
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Augustus FitzRoy
The Duke of Grafton
14 Oct. 1768
28 Jan. 1770
1768 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[16]
Attempted to reconcile with the American colonies.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Lord Frederick North 28 Jan. 1770
22 March 1782
1774, 1780 Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[17]
Led Great Britain into the American Revolution, making a number of tactical errors; the Gordon Riots; attempted reform in Ireland; resigned after a vote of no confidence against the will of the King.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Charles Watson-Wentworth
The Marquess of Rockingham
(2nd ministry)
27 March 1782
1 July 1782
Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Acknowledged the independence of the United States; began a process of economic reform. Died in office.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Petty
The Earl of Shelburne
4 July 1782
2 April 1783
Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Planned political reform; secured peace with the United States, France and Spain.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Cavendish-Bentinck
The Duke of Portland

(1st ministry)
2 April 1783
19 Dec. 1783
Whig
(Fox-North Coalition)
First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Titular head of the Fox-North Coalition. Attempted to reform the British East India Company, but was blocked by George III.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | William Pitt the Younger
(1st ministry)
19 Dec. 1783
14 March 1801
1784, 1790, 1796 Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[18]
India Act 1784; attempted to remove rotten boroughs; youngest Prime Minister; personally opposed to the slave trade; reduced the national debt due to the rebellion in the North American colonies; formed the Triple Alliance; Constitutional Act of 1791; war with France starting in 1793; introduced the first income tax; Act of Union 1800.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Henry Addington 17 March 1801
10 May 1804
1801 co-option, 1802 Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[10]
Negotiated the Treaty of Amiens with France in 1802.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | William Pitt the Younger
(2nd ministry)
10 May 1804
23 Jan. 1806
Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[10]
Alliance with Russia, Austria and Sweden against France (Third Coalition); Battle of Trafalgar; Battle of Ulm; Battle of Austerlitz.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Wyndham Grenville
The Lord Grenville
11 Feb. 1806
31 March 1807
1806 Whig
(Ministry of All the Talents)
First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Abolition of the slave trade.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | William Cavendish-Bentinck
The Duke of Portland
(2nd ministry)
31 March 1807
4 Oct. 1809
1807 Tory First Lord of the Treasury [10]
He headed a Tory government; was old and ill, leaving the Cabinet to their own devices (largely headed by Spencer Perceval).
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Spencer Perceval 4 Oct. 1809
11 May 1812
Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer,
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
& Leader of the House of Commons
[19]
Descent of George III into madness; his administration was notable for the lack of senior statesmen (Perceval also served as the Chancellor of the Exchequer); Peninsular War, part of the Napoleonic Wars. As of 2008, the only Prime Minister to have been assassinated.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Robert Banks Jenkinson
Lord Liverpool
8 June 1812
9 April 1827
1812, 1818, 1820, 1826 Tory First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[20]
Oversaw the United Kingdom's victory in the Napoleonic Wars; the Congress of Vienna; an economic recession in 1817; The War of 1812 (in Britain, the American War of 1812 to 1815); Peterloo Massacre in 1819; return to the gold standard in 1819; the Cato Street Conspiracy to assassinate Liverpool in 1820.

Prime Ministers under George IV (1820–1830)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | George Canning 10 April 1827
8 Aug 1827
Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[10]
Died shortly after taking office.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Frederick John Robinson
The Viscount Goderich
31 Aug. 1827
21 Jan. 1828
Tory First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Lacked support amongst colleagues; resigned.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Arthur Wellesley
The Duke of Wellington

(1st ministry)
22 Jan. 1828
16 Nov. 1830
1830 Tory First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[10]
Catholic Emancipation Bill (over which he fought a duel).

Prime Ministers under William IV (1830–1837)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Charles Grey
The Earl Grey
22 Nov. 1830
9 July 1834
1831, 1832 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[21]
Reform Act 1832; restriction of employment of children; reform of the Poor Laws; abolition of slavery throughout the British Empire.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Lamb
The Viscount Melbourne

(1st ministry)
16 July 1834
14 Nov. 1834
Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[22]
William IV's opposition forced him to resign.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:Tory Party/meta/color" | Arthur Wellesley
The Duke of Wellington
(2nd ministry)
14 Nov. 1834
10 Dec. 1834
Tory First Lord of the Treasury,
Secretary of State for the Home Department,
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs,
Secretary of State for War and the Colonies
& Leader of the House of Lords
[23]
Caretaker government while Sir Robert Peel was located and returned to London. Held many of the major posts himself.
Sir Robert Peel
(1st ministry)
10 Dec. 1834
8 April 1835
1835 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
& Leader of the House of Commons
[24][25]
†Minority government. Unable to form a majority in Parliament so resigned.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | William Lamb
The Viscount Melbourne
(2nd ministry)
18 April 1835
30 Aug. 1841
1835, 1837 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[26]
A father figure to Queen Victoria; Municipal Corporations Act 1835.

Prime Ministers under Victoria (1837–1901)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
Sir Robert Peel
(2nd ministry)
30 Aug. 1841
29 June 1846
1841 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[27]
Mines Act 1842; Factory Act 1844; Railway Act 1844; repeal of the Corn Laws (triggered by the Great Irish Potato Famine).
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Lord John Russell
(1st ministry)
30 June 1846
21 Feb. 1852
1847 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[28]
†Minority government, but with the Conservatives split between Protectionists and Peelites, the Whigs held power. Education Act 1847; Australian Colonies Act 1850; improved the Poor laws.
Edward Smith-Stanley
The Earl of Derby

(1st ministry)
23 Feb. 1852
17 Dec. 1852
1852 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[29]
Government collapsed when his Chancellor's Budget was defeated.
File:4th Earl of George Hamilton-Gordon
The Earl of Aberdeen
19 Dec. 1852
30 Jan. 1855
Peelite/Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[30]
Only Peelite Prime Minister. Led the country into the Crimean War; resigned after defeat in the vote for an inquiry into the conduct of the war.
rowspan="2" style="background-color: Template:British Whig Party/meta/color" | Henry John Temple
The Viscount Palmerston

(1st ministry)
6 Feb. 1855
19 Feb. 1858
1857 Whig First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[31]
Responded to the Indian mutiny of 1857; introduced the India Bill.
Edward Smith-Stanley
The Earl of Derby
(2nd ministry)
20 Feb. 1858
11 June 1859
Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[32]
Government of India Act 1858, transferring ownership of the East India Company to the Crown; Jews Relief Act, allowing Jews to become MPs.
Henry John Temple
The Viscount Palmerston
(2nd ministry)
12 June 1859
18 Oct. 1865
1859, 1865 Liberal First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[33]
Between periods in office he founded the Liberal Party; term dominated by policy concerning the American Civil War. Died in office.
John Russell
The Earl Russell

(2nd ministry)
29 Oct. 1865
26 June 1866
Liberal First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[34]
Attempted to introduce a further Reform Bill, but was opposed by his Cabinet.
Edward Smith-Stanley
The Earl of Derby
(3rd ministry)
28 June 1866
25 Feb. 1868
Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Lords
[35]
Reform Act 1867; considered by some to be the father of the modern Conservative Party.
Benjamin Disraeli
(1st ministry)
27 Feb. 1868
1 Dec. 1868
Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[36]
Only Jewish Prime Minister (thus far); dissolved Parliament as the Conservatives did not have a majority.
William Ewart Gladstone
(1st ministry)
3 Dec. 1868
17 Feb. 1874
1868 Liberal First Lord of the Treasury,
Leader of the House of Commons
& Chancellor of the Exchequer (1873–74)
[37]
Introduced reforms to the British Army, Civil Service and local government; made peacetime flogging illegal; Ballot Act 1872; Corrupt and Illegal Practices Prevention Act 1883; failed to prevent the Franco-Prussian War.
Benjamin Disraeli
The Earl of Beaconsfield
(2nd ministry)
20 Feb. 1874
21 April 1880
1874 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury,
Leader of the House of Commons (1874–1876),
Lord Privy Seal (1876–78)
& Leader of the House of Lords (1876–80)
[38]
Various social reforms including the Climbing Boys Act 1875, the Public Health Act 1875 and the Artisan's and Labourers' Dwellings Improvement Act 1875; purchase of shares in the Suez Canal Company; Congress of Berlin; reintroduction of Queen Victoria to public life, including bestowing the title Empress of India; Second Ango-Afghan War; breaking up of the League of the Three Emperors; the Zulu War.
William Ewart Gladstone
(2nd ministry)
23 April 1880
9 June 1885
1880 Liberal First Lord of the Treasury,
Leader of the House of Commons
& Chancellor of the Exchequer (1880–82)
[39]
First Boer War; Irish Coercion Act; Reform Act 1884, Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 (sometimes known collectively as the Third Reform Act); failure to rescue General Gordon in Khartoum, Sudan.
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
The Marquess of Salisbury
(1st ministry)
23 June 1885
28 Jan. 1886
1885 Conservative Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
& Leader of the House of Lords
[40]
†Minority government. Legislation providing for housing the working class.
William Ewart Gladstone
(3rd ministry)
1 Feb. 1886
20 July 1886
1885 Liberal First Lord of the Treasury,
Lord Privy Seal
& Leader of the House of Commons
[41]
First introduction of the Home Rule Bill for Ireland, which split the Liberal Party, resulting in the end of Gladstone's government.
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
The Marquess of Salisbury
(2nd ministry)
25 July 1886
11 Aug. 1892
1886 Conservative Leader of the House of Lords,
First Lord of the Treasury (1886–87)
& Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (1887–92)
[42]
Opposed Irish home rule; Local Government Act 1888; Partition of Africa; Free Education Act 1891; creation of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe).
William Ewart Gladstone
(4th ministry)
15 Aug. 1892
2 March 1894
1892 Liberal First Lord of the Treasury,
Lord Privy Seal
& Leader of the House of Commons
[43]
†Minority government. Reintroduction of the Home Rule Bill, which was passed by the House of Commons but rejected by the House of Lords leading to his resignation.
Archibald Primrose
The Earl of Rosebery
5 March 1894
22 June 1895
Liberal First Lord of the Treasury,
Lord President of the Council
& Leader of the House of Lords
[44]
Imperialist; plans for expanding the Royal Navy caused disagreement within the Liberal Party; resigned following a vote of censure over military supplies.
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
The Marquess of Salisbury
(3rd ministry)
25 June 1895
11 July 1902
1895, 1900 Conservative Leader of the House of Lords,
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (1895–1900)
& Lord Privy Seal (1900–02)
[45]
Workmen's Compensation Act 1897; Second Boer War; Anglo-Japanese Alliance.

Prime Ministers under Edward VII (1901–1910)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
Arthur Balfour 11 July 1902
5 Dec. 1905
Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[10]
Had poor relations with Edward VII; his cabinet was split over free trade; establishment of the Committee of Imperial Defence; Entente Cordiale.
Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman 5 Dec. 1905
7 April 1908
1906 Liberal First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[10]
Restored autonomy to Transvaal and the Orange Free State; Anglo-Russian Entente; first Prime Minister to be referred to as such in Parliamentary legislation.
Herbert Henry Asquith 7 April 1908
7 Dec. 1916
January 1910†,
December 1910
Liberal First Lord of the Treasury,
Leader of the House of Commons
& Secretary of State for War (1914)
[10]
†Hung Parliaments. Liberal Welfare Reforms; People's Budget; Parliament Act 1911; National Insurance and pensions; Home Rule Act 1914; World War I; Easter Rising.

Prime Ministers under George V (1910–1936) and Edward VIII (1936)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
David Lloyd George 7 Dec. 1916
19 Oct. 1922
1918 Liberal
(Coalition)
First Lord of the Treasury [46]
Welsh-speaking: only Prime Minister (thus far) whose mother tongue was not English. End of World War I; Paris Peace Conference; attempted to extend conscription to Ireland during the First World War; granted women over 30 the vote; formation of the Irish Free State.
Andrew Bonar Law 23 Oct. 1922
20 May 1923
1922 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[47]
Canadian-born: only Prime Minister (thus far) born outside the British Isles. Resigned due to ill health; died six months after leaving office.
Stanley Baldwin
(1st ministry)
23 May 1923
16 Jan. 1924
Conservative First Lord of the Treasury,
Leader of the House of Commons
& Chancellor of the Exchequer (1923)
[48]
Called a general election to gain a mandate for protectionist tariffs but failed to gain a majority; resigned after losing a vote of confidence.
Ramsay MacDonald
(1st ministry)
22 Jan. 1924
4 Nov. 1924
1923 Labour First Lord of the Treasury,
Leader of the House of Commons
& Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
[49]
†Hung Parliament; minority government reliant on Liberal support. First Labour Prime Minister; did not have a majority so could not introduce radical legislation; settled reparations with Germany following World War I.
Stanley Baldwin
(2nd ministry)
4 Nov. 1924
5 June 1929
1924 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[50]
Treaty of Locarno; signatory of the Kellogg-Briand Pact; Pensions Act; enfranchisement of women over 21; UK General Strike of 1926.
Ramsay MacDonald
(2nd ministry)
5 June 1929
24 Aug. 1931
1929 Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[51]
†Hung Parliament. Appointed the first female minister, Margaret Bondfield; economic crises following the Wall Street Crash of 1929.
Ramsay MacDonald
(3rd ministry)
24 Aug. 1931
7 June 1935
1931 National Labour
(National Government)
First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[52]
Unable to retain the support of the Labour Party, MacDonald officially resigned and was then re-appointed to form a National Government with the support of the Conservative and Liberal parties. He was expelled from the Labour Party.
Stanley Baldwin
(3rd ministry)
7 June 1935
28 May 1937
1935 Conservative
(National Government)
First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[53]
Edward VIII abdication crisis; started rearmament but later criticised for failing to rearm more when Adolf Hitler broke Germany's Treaty of Versailles obligations.

Prime Ministers under George VI (1936–1952)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
Neville Chamberlain 28 May 1937
10 May 1940
Conservative
(National Government;
War Government)
First Lord of the Treasury
& Leader of the House of Commons
[10]
Attempted to prevent World War II through appeasement of Germany; widely criticised following the German invasion of Poland; resigned after failing to form a Coalition Government.
Winston Churchill
(1st ministry)
10 May 1940
23 May 1945
Conservative
(Coalition)
First Lord of the Treasury,
Minister of Defence
& Leader of the House of Commons (1940–42)
[54]
World War II; led a Coalition Government; foundation of the United Nations; proposed what would eventually lead to the European Union.
Winston Churchill
(2nd ministry)
23 May 1945
26 July 1945
Conservative
(Caretaker)
First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister of Defence
[55]
Following the ending of his all-party coalition, Churchill formed a "caretaker" government out of Conservatives, Liberal Nationals and non-party figures. However after two months it was defeated in the 1945 general election.
Clement Attlee 26 July 1945
26 Oct. 1951
1945, 1950 Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister of Defence (1945–46)
[56]
Initiated the post-war consensus; introduced nationalisation of utilities; foundation of the National Health Service; extended national insurance scheme; independence of India and the end of the British role in Palestine; foundation of NATO; beginning of the Cold War; the Berlin Blockade and the resulting Berlin Airlift; the start of British involvement in the Korean War.
Sir Winston Churchill
(3rd ministry)
26 Oct. 1951
7 April 1955
1951 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister of Defence (1951–52)
[57]
Domestic policy interrupted by foreign disputes (Korean War, Operation Ajax, Mau Mau Uprising, Malayan Emergency).

Prime Ministers under Elizabeth II (1952–Present)

  Portrait Name Term of office Electoral mandates Political party Other ministerial offices
held while Prime Minister
Refs
Sir Anthony Eden 7 April 1955
10 Jan. 1957
1955 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury [58]
Failed to prevent the Egyptian nationalisation of the Suez Canal; invaded Egypt, leading to the Suez Crisis.
Harold Macmillan 10 Jan. 1957
19 Oct. 1963
1959 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury [59]
The UK applied to join the European Economic Community for the first time, the application split the Conservatives and was rejected by Charles de Gaulle, President of France; Profumo Affair.
Sir Alec Douglas-Home 19 Oct. 1963
16 Oct. 1964
Conservative First Lord of the Treasury [60]
Was the Earl of Home when he became Prime Minister, and renounced his peerage on 23 October 1963 in order to stand for the House of Commons.
Harold Wilson
(1st ministry)
16 Oct. 1964
19 June 1970
1964, 1966 Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service (1968-70)
[61]
Social reforms, including legalisation of abortion and decriminalisation of homosexuality; Rhodesian U.D.I.; adopted, then abandoned, the National Plan for the economy; Devaluation of the pound; foundation of the Open University; dispute over In Place of Strife trade union reforms.
Edward Heath 19 June 1970
4 March 1974
1970 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[62]
U-turned over intervention in industry; negotiated Britain's entry to the European Community; Violence due to Northern Ireland's "Troubles" peaked; the Sunningdale Agreement agreed; Three-Day Week; called early election in backfiring attempt to confront striking miners.
Harold Wilson
(2nd ministry)
4 March 1974
5 April 1976
February 1974†,
October 1974
Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[63]
†Hung Parliament. Ended dispute with miners; Social Contract with trade unions over the economy; Health and Safety at Work Act; Renegotiated terms for EC membership, then 1975 referendum validated entry; North Sea oil, Cod War.
James Callaghan 5 April 1976
4 May 1979
Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[64][65]
International Monetary Fund loan to support the pound; the Lib-Lab pact; enacted devolution to Scotland and Wales but referendums stopped them; relations with trade unions broke down in the Winter of Discontent.
Margaret Thatcher 4 May 1979
28 Nov. 1990
1979, 1983, 1987 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[66][67]
First female Prime Minister of the UK; Falklands War; sold council housing to tenants (right to buy) without replacement; miners' strike 1984–5; privatisation of many previously government-owned industries; decreased the power of trade unions; Anglo-Irish Agreement; Section 28; abolition of GLC; Sino-British joint declaration; negotiation of the UK rebate towards the European Community budget; Westland Affair; the "Poll tax"; Lockerbie bombing, the end of the Cold War.
John Major 28 Nov. 1990
2 May 1997
1992 Conservative First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[68][69]
Global recession; Gulf War; ratification of the Maastricht Treaty and the Maastricht Rebels; forced exit from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism ("Black Wednesday"); the Downing Street Declaration (initiating the Northern Ireland peace process); Citizen's charter; Sunday Shopping; "Back to Basics" campaign; Cones Hotline; Dangerous Dogs Act.
Tony Blair 2 May 1997
27 June 2007
1997, 2001, 2005 Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[70][71]
Hong Kong handover; Independence for the Bank of England; Ecclestone tobacco controversy; Belfast Agreement; Human Rights Act; devolution to Scotland and Wales; House of Lords Reform; Minimum wage; Kosovo War; Mayor of London and Greater London Authority; War in Afghanistan; Iraq War; University tuition fees; Civil Partnership Act; 7 July 2005 London bombings; Cash for Peerages; Identity cards.
Gordon Brown 27 June 2007
Incumbent
Labour First Lord of the Treasury
& Minister for the Civil Service
[72]
London car bombs; Glasgow Airport attack; foot-and-mouth outbreak (2007); national floods; child benefit data misplaced; Donorgate; Northern Rock; Treaty of Lisbon; 42 Days detention; 10p Tax rate; Financial crisis of 2007–2009; Parliamentary expenses scandal.

See also

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Timelines

References

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Bibliography

External links



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