The Full Wiki

More info on palatal consonant

palatal consonant: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Places of
articulation

Template:•Labial
Bilabial
Labial-velar
Labial-alveolar
Labiodental

Template:•Bidental

Template:•Coronal
Linguolabial
Interdental
Dental
Denti-alveolar
Alveolar
Apical
Laminal
Postalveolar
Alveolo-palatal
Retroflex

Template:•Dorsal
Palatal
Labial-palatal
Velar
Uvular
Uvular-epiglottal

Template:•Radical
Pharyngeal
Epiglotto-pharyngeal
Epiglottal

Template:•Glottal

This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]

Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth). Consonants with the tip of the tongue curled back against the palate are called retroflex.

The most common type of palatal consonant is the extremely common approximant [j], which ranks as overall, among the ten most common sounds in the world's languages. The nasal ɲ is also common, occurring in around 35 percent of the world's languages[1], in most of which its equivalent obstruent is not the plosive c, but the affricate . Only a few languages in northern Eurasia, the Americas and central Africa contrast palatal plosives with postalveolar affricates - the only common ones being Hungarian, Czech, Slovak and Albanian.

Warning: the IPA symbols are commonly used, not for palatal stops, but for the palatalized velar stops [kʲ, ɡʲ], or the palatal affricates [c͡ç, ɟ͡ʝ], or the alveolopalatal affricates [t͡ɕ, d͡ʑ], or even the postalveolar affricates [t͡ʃ, d͡ʒ]. This is an old IPA tradition. True palatal stops are relatively uncommon, so it is a good idea to verify the pronunciation whenever you see in the transcription of a language.

Consonants with other primary articulations may be palatalised, that is, accompanied by the raising of the tongue surface towards the hard palate. For example, English [ʃ] (spelled sh) has such a palatal component, although its primary articulation involves the tip of the tongue and the upper gum (this type of articulation is called palatoalveolar).

In phonology, palatalized, alveolo-palatal, palatoalveolar and postalveolar consonants are commonly grouped as palatals, since these categories rarely contrast with true palatals.

The palatal consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:

IPA Description Example
Language Orthography IPA Meaning
palatal nasal French agneau [aɲo] lamb
voiceless palatal plosive Hungarian hattyú [] swan
voiced palatal plosive Latvian ģimene [ɟimene] family
voiceless palatal fricative German nicht [çt] not
voiced palatal fricative Spanish yema [ʝema] egg yolk
palatal approximant English yes [jɛs] yes
palatal lateral approximant Italian gli [ʎi] the (masculine plural)
voiced palatal implosive Swahili hujambo [huʄambo] hello

Notes

  1. ^ Ian Maddieson (with a chapter contributed by Sandra Ferrari Disner); Patterns of sounds; Cambridge University Press, 1984. ISBN 0-521-26536-3

References

See also

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message