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Encyclopedia

Contents

Ring may refer to:

Jewelry

Sound

Mathematics

Geometry

Science and engineering

  • Planetary ring, a flat disc-shaped ring of matter orbiting a planet
  • Ring circuit, electrical wiring technique
  • Piston ring, an automotive part, an open-ended ring that fits into a groove on the outer diameter of a piston
  • Cyclic compound, a series of carbon atoms connected in the form of a loop or ring.
  • Ring armature, in electric motors such as on a Gramme machine

Medical

  • Internal abdominal ring (annulus inguinalis abdominis; internal or deep abdominal ring): situated in the transversalis fascia, midway between the anterior superior iliac spine and the symphysis pubis
  • Femoral ring, the base of the femoral canal
  • Vascular ring a congenital defect in which there is an abnormal formation of the aorta and/or its surrounding blood vessels
  • NuvaRing, a combined hormonal contraceptive vaginal ring

Computing

Entertainment

Sports

Films

  • The Rings, or Zangha, a 1985 Iranian horror film
  • Ring (film), or Ringu, a 1998 Japanese horror film based on the Suzuki novel
  • The Ring (2002 film), an American adaptation of the Japanese film
  • Rings (short film) a 2005 American horror direct-to-video short film by Jonathan Liebesman starring Ryan Merriman, Emily VanCamp, Kelly Stables, Alexandra Breckenridge, Josh Wise, Justin Allen and Andrew D'Amico

Television

Fiction

Music

Organizations

Miscellaneous

Geography

  • Ring Mountain, the name of several mountains in Canada and the United States

See also


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also Ring

Contents

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old English hring, from Germanic *hrengaz

Noun

Singular
ring

Plural
rings

ring (plural rings)

  1. A circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
  2. A round piece of (precious) metal worn around the finger.
  3. (British) A bird band, a round piece of metal put around a bird's leg used for identification and studies of migration.
  4. A piece of food in the shape of a ring, as in onion ring
  5. A place where some sports or exhibitions take place; notably a circular or comparable arena, such as a boxing ring or a circus ring; hence the field of a political contest.
  6. An exclusive group of people, usually involving some unethical or illegal practices; as a crime ring.
  7. (geometry) A planar geometrical figure included between two concentric circles.
  8. (astronomy) A formation of various pieces of material orbiting around a planet.
  9. (typography) A diacritical mark in the shape of a hollow circle placed above or under the letter.
  10. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the coomb or half a quarter.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, page 168.
      The ring is common in the Huntingdonshire accounts of Ramsey Abbey. It was equal to half a quarter, i.e., is identical with the coomb of the eastern counties. —
  11. (British) a large circular prehistoric stone construction such as w:Stonehenge.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

Infinitive
to ring

Third person singular
rings

Simple past
ringed

Past participle
ringed

Present participle
ringing

to ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past and past participle ringed)

  1. (transitive) To surround or enclose.
    The inner city was ringed with dingy industrial areas.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make an incision around; to girdle.
    They ringed the trees to make the clearing easier next year.
  3. (transitive) To attach a ring to, especially for identification.
    Only ringed hogs may forage in the commons.
    We managed to ring 22 birds this morning.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Verb is from Old English hringan.

Noun

Singular
ring

Plural
rings

ring (plural rings)

  1. The resonant sound of a bell, or a sound resembling it.
    The church bell's ring could be heard the length of the valley.
    The ring of hammer on anvil filled the air.
  2. (figuratively) A pleasant or correct sound.
    The name has a nice ring to it.
  3. (colloquial) A telephone call.
    I’ll give you a ring when the plane lands.
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

Infinitive
to ring

Third person singular
rings

Simple past
rang

Past participle
rung

Present participle
ringing

to ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past rang, past participle rung)

  1. (intransitive, figuratively) To produce the sound of a bell or a similar sound.
    Whose mobile phone is ringing?
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make a (church) bell produce sound.
    The deliveryman rang the doorbell to drop off a parcel.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) Of something spoken or written, to appear to be, to seem, to sound.
    That does not ring true.
  4. (colloquial) To telephone someone.
    I will ring you when we arrive.
  5. (ambitransitive) to resound, reverberate, echo
    • 1919, Boris Sidis, The Source and Aim of Human Progress:
      It is instructive for us to learn as well as to ponder on the fact that "the very men who looked down with delight, when the sand of the arena reddened with human blood, made the arena ring with applause when Terence in his famous line: ‘Homo sum, Nihil humani alienum puto’ proclaimed the brotherhood of man."
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 3

A shortening of German Zahlring (number(s) ring); coined by mathematician David Hilbert in 1892, . (Reference: Harvey Cohn, Advanced Number Theory, page 49.)

Noun

Singular
ring

Plural
rings

ring (plural rings)

  1. (algebra) An algebraic structure which is a group under addition and a monoid under multiplication.
    The set of integers, \mathbb{Z}, is the prototypical ring.
Translations

Anagrams


Balinese

Preposition

ring

  1. in, at

Croatian

Etymology

From English ring.

Noun

ring m. sg.

  1. The ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Czech

Noun

ring m.

  1. The ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hringr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /reng/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Noun

ring c. (singular definite ringen, plural indefinite ringe)

  1. ring
  2. circle
  3. halo
  4. hoop
  5. coil
Inflection

Etymology 2

Verbal noun to ringe (to ring).

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /reng/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Noun

ring n. (singular definite ringet, plural indefinite ring)

  1. ring (the resonant sound of a bell, a telephone call)
Inflection

Etymology 3

See ringe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /reng/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Verb

ring

  1. Imperative of ringe.

Dutch

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Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Ring

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation

Noun

ring m. (plural ringen, diminutive ringetje, diminutive plural ringetjes)

  1. A ring, hollow circular object
  2. A beltway

Derived terms

See also


Hungarian

Verb

ring

  1. To sway

Norwegian

Noun

ring m.

  1. A ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place

Old High German

Etymology

Proto-Germanic *hrengaz

Noun

ring m.

  1. A ring

Swedish

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

Noun

Inflection for ring Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form ring ringen ringar ringarna
Possessive form rings ringens ringars ringarnas

ring

  1. A ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
  3. (mathematics) A ring, algebraic structure
  4. (mathematics) A ring,planar geometrical figure
  5. (astronomy) A ring, collection of material orbiting some planets
  6. Each of the (usually three) years in a Swedish gymnasium (highschool)
    Ann började nyss andra ring = Ann recently began her second year at the gymnasium.

Etymology 2

See ringa.

Pronunciation

Verb

ring

  1. imperative form of ringa

Simple English

This article is about pieces of jewelry. There is an article about mathematical concepts at Ring (mathematics)

A ring is a piece of jewelry that is usually worn on the finger. It is often made of metal such as gold, silver, platinum, but can be made of other things, for example, bone or glass. Many rings have gemstones on them, for beauty and decoration on your finger.

Engagement and wedding rings

Rings have been used for engagements and weddings since prehistoric times.[1]

The engagement ring is meant to be a sign of luck and happiness. Both men and women used to wear an engagement ring to show that they were going to be married, but in more recent times only women have normally worn them. A diamond ring is seen as being especially lucky, as the sparkle of the diamond is said to come from the fires of love. A pearl in a ring is unlucky, as the pearl is a sign of tears.[1]

Because the ring is round and does not have an end, it is seen as a symbol of love which never ends. It is thought to be unlucky to remove your wedding ring unless it is absolutely necessary.[1]

References

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