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The stern is the rear or aft part of a ship or boat, technically defined as the area built up over the sternpost, extending upwards from the counter to the taffrail. The stern lies opposite of the bow, the foremost part of a ship.

Contents

Stern area

The stern area is the location of the steering apparatus (rudder, tiller, ship's wheel, etc), and by extension became the domain of the ship's captain and other officers and a place to stay. In particular, the stern was the location of the officers' quarters, and during the age of sail became the most opulent part of the ship, with rows of windows, galleries, walkways, and elaborate decorations. This resulted in a certain amount of vulnerability, and the goal of much maneuvering in battle was to achieve the stern rake, in which a ship would pour its entire broadside into the stern.

Features

Other features of the stern included lanterns and the ensign.

Types

Several types of sterns exist. These include [1]:

  • straight sterns
  • flat sterns

History

Early ships

In the early part of the 19th century, the stern of larger ships became gradually more rounded, and with the advent of screw-powered vessels, the stern became the location of the equipment, the officers moving elsewhere, though British ships still contained an Admiral's sternwalk until well into the twentieth century.

Modern cruiseships

In modern cruise ships, the stern is frequently the location of the dining room, so as to provide uninterrupted views of the sea.

Modern warships

In modern warships, particularly cruisers and destroyers, the stern is usually where the helicopter pad is located. The stern tends to be lower set when compared to other parts of the ship, and may contain a large caliber gun mount or missile magazines. Aircraft carriers typically use the deck space in the stern part of the ship for the recovery of incoming aircraft. Aircraft carriers may have aircraft elevators in the stern area to prevent interference of flight operations, which are launched from the bow. For submarines, both fast attack and ballistic missile, the stern is generally the location of the engine room and the motor room, if the submarine has one. If the submarine runs on nuclear power the stern may contain a heat exchanger and other parts associated with a nuclear reactor.

Gallery

References

Template:Commonscat


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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See also Stern

Contents

English

Pronunciation

  • stû(r)n, /stɜː(r)n/, /st3:(r)n/
  •  Audio (US)help, file

Adjective

stern (comparative sterner, superlative sternest)

  1. having a hardness and severity of nature or manner
  2. grim and forbidding in appearance

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun

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Singular
stern

Plural
sterns

stern (plural sterns)

  1. (nautical) The rear part or after end of a ship or vessel.

Antonyms

Translations

Anagrams


Simple English

, by Jean Bérain the Elder.]] The stern is the rear part of a ship or boat.

The stern area has always been the place near the steering apparatus (rudder, tiller, ship's wheel, etc), and by extension became the domain of the ship's captain and other officers. In particular, the stern was the location of the officers' quarters, and during the age of sail became the most opulent part of the ship, with rows of windows, galleries, walkways, and fine decorations. That meant that this part was rather vulnerable, and the goal of much maneuvering in battle was to achieve the stern rake, in which a ship would pour its entire broadside into the stern.

Other features of the stern included lanterns and the ensign.

Gallery

Other pages








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