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Hijra
Other names The Flight of Mahomet;[1][2] The Migration of Mohammad; The Migration; Hijrah; Hegira
Participants Muhammad and his followers
Location Arabian Peninsula
Date 622
Result Renaming Yathrib as "the City (of the Prophet)" (Medina); Enmity between the Aus tribe and Khazraj tribes dampened (tribes converted to Islam); Muhammad made political leader and united the new Muslims

The Hijra (هِجْرَة) is the migration of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and his followers to the city of Medina in 622 (Common Era). Alternate spellings of this Arabic word in the Latin alphabet are Hijrah, or Hegira in Latin.

Contents

Hijra of Muhammad

In September 622, warned of a plot to assassinate him, Muhammad secretly slipped out of Mecca with Abu Bakr.[3] By degrees, Muhammad and his followers emigrated to the city of Yathrib, 320 kilometres (200 mi) north of Mecca. Yathrib was soon renamed Madinat un-Nabi, literally "the City of the Prophet", but un-Nabi was soon dropped, so its name in English is Medina, meaning "the city".[4] The Muslim year during which the Hijra occurred was designated the first year of the Islamic calendar by Umar in 638 or 17 AH (anno hegirae = "in the year of the hijra").[4] In the following chronology[4] the city will be referred to as Medina, and the region surrounding it as Yathrib.

Day Date Notes
Day 1
Thursday
26 Safar AH 1
(9 September 622)
Left home in Mecca. Stayed three days in the Cave of Thur near Mecca.
Day 5
Monday
1 Rabi' I AH 1
(13 September 622)
Left the environs of Mecca. Traveled to the region of Yathrib.
Day 12
Monday
8 Rabi' I AH 1
(20 September 622)
Arrived at Quba' near Medina.
Day 16
Friday
12 Rabi' I AH 1
(24 September 622)
First visit to Medina for Friday prayers.
Day 26
Monday
22 Rabi' I AH 1
(4 October 622)
Moved from Quba' to Medina.

The Muslim dates are in the Islamic calendar extended back in time. The Western dates are in the Julian calendar. The lunar year is about 300/309 solar year. The Hijra is celebrated annually on 8 Rabi' I, about 66 days after 1 Muharram, the first day of the Muslim year. Many writers confuse the first day of the year of the Hijra with the Hijra itself, erroneously stating that the Hijra occurred on 1 Muharram AH 1 or 16 July 622.[4]

All dates given above may have occurred about 89 days (three lunar months) earlier. The Muslim dates may be those recorded in the original Arabic calendar and their month names may not have been changed to account for the (probably three) intercalary months inserted during the next nine years until intercalary months were prohibited during the year of Muhammad's last Hajj (AH 10).

First Hijra

Technically, the first Hijra occurred in 615 when a group of Muslims was counseled by Muhammad to escape persecution in Mecca and travel to the Kingdom of Axum, which was ruled by a Christian king (see Islam in Ethiopia). Muhammad himself did not join this emigration. In that year, his followers fled Mecca's leading tribe, the Quraysh, who sent emissaries to Axum to bring them back to Arabia. The nascent movement faced growing opposition and persecution. When Muhammad and his followers received an invitation from the people of Yathrib, they decided to leave Mecca.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Dates of Epoch-Making Events", The Nuttall Encyclopaedia. (Gutenberg version)
  2. ^ Mahomet is an archaisms used for Muhammad. See Medieval Christian view of Muhammad for more information.
  3. ^ Moojan Momen (1985), p. 5
  4. ^ a b c d F. A. Shamsi, "The Date of Hijrah", Islamic Studies 23 (1984): 189-224, 289-323.

External links

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This article is about Hijra (Islam). For other uses see Hijra

Hijra (هِجْرَة), or withdrawal, is the word that is used for the movement of Muhammad and most of his followers from Mecca to Medina in 622. The Hijra was also the beginning of the Muslim calendar(Common Era). Alternate spellings of this Arabic word in the Latin alphabet are Hijrah, or Hegira in Latin. [1]

Contents

Chronology of the Hijra

  • Day 1: Thursday 26 Safar AH 1, 9 September 622
    • Left home in Mecca. Stayed three days in the Cave of Thawr near Mecca.
  • Day 5: Monday 1 Rabi' I AH 1, 13 September 622
    • Left the environs of Mecca. Traveled to the region of Yathrib.
  • Day 12: Monday 8 Rabi' I AH 1, 20 September 622
    • Arrived at Quba' near Medina.
  • Day 16: Friday 12 Rabi' I AH 1, 24 September 622
    • First visit to Medina for Friday prayers.
  • Day 26: Monday 22 Rabi' I AH 1, 4 October 622
    • Moved from Quba' to Medina.

The Muslim dates are in the Islamic calendar extended back in time. The Western dates are in the Julian calendar. The Hijra is celebrated annually on 8 Rabi' I, about 66 days after 1 Muharram, the first day of the Muslim year. Many writers confuse the first day of the year of the Hijra with the Hijra itself, erroneously stating that the Hijra occurred on 1 Muharram AH 1 or 16 July 622.[2]

Other pages

References

  1. To be precise, the first Hijra was in 615 when a band of Muslims were counseled by Muhammad to escape persecution in Mecca and travel to the Kingdom of Axum, which was ruled by a Christian king (see Islam in Ethiopia). Muhammad himself did not join this emigration. In that year, his followers fled Mecca's leading tribe, the Quraysh, who sent emissaries to Axum to bring them back to Arabia. The nascent movement faced growing opposition and persecution. When Muhammad and his followers received an invitation from the people of Yathrib, they decided to leave Mecca.
  2. All dates given above may have occurred about 89 days (three lunar months) earlier. The Muslim dates may be those recorded in the original Arabic calendar and their month names may not have been changed to account for the (probably three) intercalary months inserted during the next nine years until intercalary months were prohibited during the year of Muhammad's last Hajj (AH 10).
  • F. A. Shamsi, "The Date of Hijrah", Islamic Studies 23 (1984): 189-224, 289-323.

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